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Broadband Infrastructure and Economic Growth

Listed author(s):
  • Nina Czernich

    ()

  • Oliver Falck
  • Tobias Kretschmer
  • Ludger Woessmann

We estimate the effect of broadband infrastructure, which enables high-speed internet, on economic growth in the panel of OECD countries in 1996-2007. Our instrumental-variable model derives its non-linear first stage from a logistic diffusion model where pre-existing voice-telephony and cable-TV networks predict maximum broadband penetration. We find that a 10 percentage-point increase in broadband penetration raises annual per-capita growth by 0.9-1.5 percentage points. Results are robust to country and year fixed effects and controlling for linear second-stage effects of our instruments. We verify that our instruments predict broadband penetration but not diffusion of contemporaneous technologies like mobile telephony and computers.

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File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/DocBase_Content/WP/WP-CESifo_Working_Papers/wp-cesifo-2009/wp-cesifo-2009-12/cesifo1_wp2861.pdf
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Paper provided by CESifo Group Munich in its series CESifo Working Paper Series with number 2861.

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Date of creation: 2009
Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_2861
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