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Housing Markets in Central and Eastern Europe: Is There a Bubble in the Czech Republic?

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  • Petr Zemcik

Abstract

Real estate prices more than doubled in many countries of Central and Eastern Europe from 2003 to 2008. In this paper, I provide the first assessment of whether housing prices in this region correspond to rents, i.e. to cash-flows related to an apartment purchase. State-of-theart panel data stationarity and Granger causality techniques are employed to test the implications of the standard present-value model using regional data from the Czech Republic. Apartment prices both in this country overall and in its capital are only slightly overvalued. In addition, changes in prices are helpful in predicting changes in rents and vice versa.

Suggested Citation

  • Petr Zemcik, 2009. "Housing Markets in Central and Eastern Europe: Is There a Bubble in the Czech Republic?," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp390, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
  • Handle: RePEc:cer:papers:wp390
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central and Eastern Europe; Czech Republic; panel data; unit root; bubble; house prices; rents.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • R21 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Housing Demand
    • R31 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - Housing Supply and Markets
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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