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Capital Inflows, Financial Repression And Macroeconomic Policy In India Since The Reforms

  • Partha Sen

    (Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi, India)

Since the early 1990s the Indian economy has seen a considerable relaxation of controls, as a consequence of which it has witnessed unprecedented growth. This is especially remarkable in the external sector. In this paper I evaluate the progress made on the macroeconomic front and address the possibility of opening up the capital account of the balance of payments. I show that given the weakness in the financial sector and the government finances, it may be dangerous to speed up the process of opening up the capital account further.

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Paper provided by Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics in its series Working papers with number 157.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cde:cdewps:157
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  1. Fernando A. Broner & Roberto Rigobon, 2005. "Why are Capital Flows so Much More Volatile in Emerging Than in Developed Countries?," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 328, Central Bank of Chile.
  2. Pami Dua & Partha Sen, 2006. "Capital Flow Volatility And Exchange Rates-- The Case Of India," Working papers 144, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
  3. Ricardo J. Caballero, 2000. "Macroeconomic Volatility in Latin America: A View and Three Case Studies," NBER Working Papers 7782, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Frederic S. Mishkin, 2004. "Can Inflation Targeting Work in Emerging Market Countries?," NBER Working Papers 10646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Vijay Joshi & Sanjeev Sanyal, 2004. "Foreign Inflows and Macroeconomic Policy in India," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(1), pages 135-188.
  6. Kletzer, Kenneth, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy and Gradual Reforms," Santa Cruz Center for International Economics, Working Paper Series qt3kj2w649, Center for International Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  7. Willem H. Buiter & Urjit R. Patel, 2005. "Excessive Budget Deficits, a Government-Abused Financial System, and Fiscal Rules," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 2(1), pages 1-54.
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