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Capital Inflows, Financial Repression And Macroeconomic Policy In India Since The Reforms

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  • Partha Sen

    (Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, Delhi, India)

Abstract

Since the early 1990s the Indian economy has seen a considerable relaxation of controls, as a consequence of which it has witnessed unprecedented growth. This is especially remarkable in the external sector. In this paper I evaluate the progress made on the macroeconomic front and address the possibility of opening up the capital account of the balance of payments. I show that given the weakness in the financial sector and the government finances, it may be dangerous to speed up the process of opening up the capital account further.

Suggested Citation

  • Partha Sen, 2007. "Capital Inflows, Financial Repression And Macroeconomic Policy In India Since The Reforms," Working papers 157, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:cde:cdewps:157
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kenneth M. Kletzer, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy, and Gradual Reforms," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(1), pages 227-275.
    2. Frederic S. Mishkin, 2004. "Can Inflation Targeting Work in Emerging Market Countries?," NBER Working Papers 10646, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Vijay Joshi & Sanjeev Sanyal, 2004. "Foreign Inflows and Macroeconomic Policy in India," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(1), pages 135-188.
    4. Pami Dua & Partha Sen, 2006. "Capital Flow Volatility And Exchange Rates-- The Case Of India," Working papers 144, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    5. Ricardo J.Caballero, 2001. "Macroeconomic volatility in Latin America: a view and three case studies," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 28(1 Year 20), pages 5-52, June.
    6. Fernando Broner & Roberto Rigobon, 2004. "Why are capital flows so much more volatile in emerging than in developed countries?," Economics Working Papers 862, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    7. Buiter Willem H. & Urjit R. Patel, 2006. "Excessive Budget Deficits, a Government-Abused Financial System, and Fiscal Rules," India Policy Forum, National Council of Applied Economic Research, vol. 2(1), pages 1-54.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ashima Goyal, 2012. "The Future Of Financial Liberalization In South Asia," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 19(1), pages 63-96, June.
    2. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611.
    3. Goyal, Ashima, 2010. "Inflows and policy: middling through," MPRA Paper 39868, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic liberalization; financial repression; capital account convertibility;

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F21 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Investment; Long-Term Capital Movements
    • F32 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Current Account Adjustment; Short-term Capital Movements
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies

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