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Returns to Early Formal Education: A Replication of Leuven et al. (2010)

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Abstract

In the Netherlands, primary schools have a rolling admissions policy. In particular, children can individually start school right after their fourth birthday instead of starting with a cohort on a fixed date. Children with birthdays during school holidays start together at the beginning of the next term. Leuven et al. (2010) indicated that these two features of the Dutch schooling system create adequate exogenous variation in children’s enrolment opportunities to identify the effects of additional early formal education on later test scores. This study replicates Leuven et al. and finds some differences.

Suggested Citation

  • Asaad Ismail Ali & Andrea K. Menclova, 2018. "Returns to Early Formal Education: A Replication of Leuven et al. (2010)," Working Papers in Economics 18/19, University of Canterbury, Department of Economics and Finance.
  • Handle: RePEc:cbt:econwp:18/19
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    File URL: https://repec.canterbury.ac.nz/cbt/econwp/1819.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. James Heckman, 2011. "Policies to foster human capital," Educational Studies, Higher School of Economics, issue 3, pages 73-137.
    2. Currie, Janet & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Does Head Start Make a Difference?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(3), pages 341-364, June.
    3. Leuven, Edwin & Lindahl, Mikael & Oosterbeek, Hessel & Webbink, Dinand, 2010. "Expanding schooling opportunities for 4-year-olds," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 319-328, June.
    4. Kawaguchi, Daiji, 2011. "Actual age at school entry, educational outcomes, and earnings," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 64-80, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Replication; early childhood education; achievement;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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