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Problems and Prospects for Dynamic Microsimulation: A review and lessons for APPSIM

  • Rebecca Cassells

    ()

    (NATSEM, University of Canberra)

  • Ann Harding

    ()

    (NATSEM, University of Canberra)

  • Simon Kelly

    (NATSEM, University of Canberra)

This paper has been prepared as the first in a series of papers associated with the development of the Australian Population and Policy Simulation Model (APPSIM). The APPSIM dynamic population microsimulation model is being developed as part of an Australian Research Council (ARC) Linkage grant (LP0562493), and will be used by Commonwealth Government policy makers and other analysts to assess the social and fiscal policy implications of Australia's ageing population. This paper reviews progress nationally and internationally on the construction of dynamic population microsimulation models and considers the lessons that might be taken from that earlier experience for the construction of the APPSIM model.

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File URL: http://www.natsem.canberra.edu.au/files/download?id=253
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Paper provided by University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling in its series NATSEM Working Paper Series with number 63.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published on NATSEM web site, Dec 2006, pages 1-50
Handle: RePEc:cba:wpaper:63
Contact details of provider: Postal: University of Canberra, ACT 2601
Phone: +61 2 (02) 6201 2750
Fax: +61 2 (02) 6201 2751
Web page: http://www.natsem.canberra.edu.au/Email:


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  1. Immervoll, Herwig & Levy, Horacio & Lietz, Christine & Mantovani, Daniela & O'Donoghue, Cathal & Sutherland, Holly & Verbist, Gerlinde, 2005. "Household Incomes and Redistribution in the European Union: Quantifying the Equalising Properties of Taxes and Benefits," IZA Discussion Papers 1824, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Hielke Buddelmeyer & John Freebairn & Guyonne Kalb, 2006. "Evaluation of Policy Options to Encourage Welfare to Work," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2006n09, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  3. Sutherland, H. (ed.), 1997. "The EUROMOD Preparatory Study: A Summary Report," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9725, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  4. Simon Kelly & Anthony King, 2001. "Australians over the Coming 50 Years: Providing Useful Projections," Brazilian Electronic Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, vol. 4(2), December.
  5. L. Wade, 1988. "Review," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 58(1), pages 99-100, July.
  6. Fran├žois Bourguignon & Amedeo Spadaro, 2006. "Microsimulation as a Tool for Evaluating Redistribution Policies," Working Papers 20, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  7. Productivity Commission, 2005. "Economic Implications of an Ageing Australia," Labor and Demography 0506001, EconWPA.
  8. Massimo Baldini, 2001. "Inequality and Redistribution over the Life-Cycle in Italy: an Analysis with a Dynamic Cohort Microsimulation Model," Brazilian Electronic Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, vol. 4(2), December.
  9. Harding, Ann, 1993. "Lifetime vs Annual Tax-Transfer Incidence: How Much Less Progressive?," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 69(205), pages 179-91, June.
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