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Micro simulations on the effects of ageing-related policy measures: The Social Affairs Department of the Netherlands Ageing and Pensions Model

  • Jan-Maarten van Sonsbeek

    ()

    (VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam)

  • j.m.van.sonsbeek@vu.nl

his paper describes a newly extended version of the dynamic micro simulation model SADNAP (Social Affairs Department of the Netherlands Ageing and Pensions model). SADNAP is being developed for calculating the financial and economic implications of the ageing of the population and of the ageing-related policy measures that are being proposed to cope with ageing. The model uses administrative datasets of Dutch public pension payments and entitlements for both public and private pensions. SADNAP has already been in use since 2007 for forecasting the state pension expenditures and for analysing the budgetary effects of policy changes. The model has been extended in order to give a broader assessment of policy alternatives by providing insight into other important evaluation indicators like income redistribution and the retirement decision of workers. For the modelling of income redistribution a new micro data source with individual data on private pensions is combined with differentiation of mortality rates in order to gain a better insight in the income at the individual level within the population of pensioners. For the modelling of the retirement decision an option value model is developed in which key parameters vary at the individual level in order to benefit from the micro simulation approach. These extensions greatly enhance the performance of SADNAP. Besides the financial implications, additional insight can now be provided into the effects of policy measures on a set of key indicators. In this paper both extensions are described in detail and a complete baseline projection of all key indicators is discussed.

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File URL: http://ima.natsem.canberra.edu.au/IJM/V4_1/Volume%204%20Issue%201/5_IJM2011_van_Sonsbeek_CORRECTED_GD_JMS.pdf
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Article provided by International Microsimulation Association in its journal International Journal of Microsimulation.

Volume (Year): 4 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 72-99

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Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:4:y:2011:i:1:p:72-99
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.microsimulation.org/ijm/

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  1. Rob Euwals & Daniel Vuuren & Ronald Wolthoff, 2010. "Early Retirement Behaviour in the Netherlands: Evidence From a Policy Reform," De Economist, Springer, vol. 158(3), pages 209-236, September.
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  10. Rob Euwals & Ruud de Mooij & Daniel van Vuuren, 2009. "Rethinking retirement; from participation towards allocation," CPB Special Publication 80, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  11. Casper van Ewijk & Nick Draper & Harry ter Rele & Ed Westerhout, 2006. "Ageing and the sustainability of Dutch public finances," CPB Special Publication 61, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
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  14. van Sonsbeek, J.M. & Gradus, R.H.J.M., 2006. "A microsimulation analysis of the 2006 regime change in the Dutch disability scheme," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 427-456, May.
  15. Lans Bovenberg & Thijs Knaap, 2005. "Ageing, Funded Pensions and the Dutch Economy," CESifo Working Paper Series 1403, CESifo Group Munich.
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