IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/unm/unumer/2012002.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

A methodological survey of dynamic microsimulation models

Author

Listed:
  • Li, Jinjing

    () (UNU-MERIT/MGSoG, Maastricht University)

  • O'Donoghue, Cathal

    (Teagasc, NUI, Ireland)

Abstract

More than 10 years ago O'Donoghue (2001) surveyed the dynamic microsimulation models that had been developed up to that point. However the 2000's have seen many of the barriers that existed for model development up until that point overcome. This paper surveys the development and practices in dynamic microsimulation over the past decade, and discusses the methodological challenges today. The paper provides an overview of the methodological choices made in more than 60 known dynamic microsimulation models and examines the advantages and disadvantages of different practices. In addition, this paper reviews the main progress made in the field and explores how future microsimulation models could evolve.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Jinjing & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2012. "A methodological survey of dynamic microsimulation models," MERIT Working Papers 002, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  • Handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2012002
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.merit.unu.edu/publications/wppdf/2012/wp2012-002.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peichl, Andreas & Schneider, Hilmar & Siegloch, Sebastian, 2010. "Documentation IZA?MOD: The IZA Policy SImulation MODel," IZA Discussion Papers 4865, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Thomas Sauerbier, 2002. "UMDBS - a New Tool for Dynamic Microsimulation," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 5(2), pages 1-5.
    3. Gijs Dekkers, 2015. "The simulation properties of microsimulation models with static and dynamic ageing a brief guide into choosing one type of model over the other," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 8(1), pages 97-109.
    4. Anne-Sophie Robilliard & Sherman Robinson, 2003. "Reconciling Household Surveys and National Accounts Data Using a Cross Entropy Estimation Method," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(3), pages 395-406, September.
    5. Jinjing Li & Cathal O'Donoghue, 2012. "Simulating Histories within Dynamic Microsimulation Models," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 5(1), pages 52-76.
    6. Luc Savard, 2003. "Poverty and Income Distribution in a CGE-Household Micro-Simulation Model: Top-Down/Bottom Up Approach," Cahiers de recherche 0343, CIRPEE.
    7. Albert Ando & Andrea Moro, 1995. "Demographic Dynamics, Labor Force Participation and Household Asset Accumulation: Case of Japan," NBER Working Papers 5261, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Riccardo Boero & Flaminio Squazzoni, 2005. "Does Empirical Embeddedness Matter? Methodological Issues on Agent-Based Models for Analytical Social Science," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 8(4), pages 1-6.
    9. Pierre Courtioux & Stéphane Gregoir & Dede Houeto, 2009. "The Simulation of the Educational Output over the Life Course: The GAMEO Model," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00391393, HAL.
    10. Simon Kelly & Anthony King, 2001. "Australians over the Coming 50 Years: Providing Useful Projections," Brazilian Electronic Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, vol. 4(2), December.
    11. Jan Nelissen, 1996. "Annualized versus non-annualized lifetime income redistribution," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(8), pages 533-536.
    12. Zucchelli, E & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2010. "The evaluation of health policies through microsimulation methods," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    13. Giulia Colombo, 2010. "Linking CGE and microsimulation models: a comparison of different approaches," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 72-91.
    14. Klevmarken, N. A., 1997. "Modelling Behavioural Response in EUROMOD," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9720, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    15. Carlo Mazzaferro & Marcello Morciano, 2008. "CAPP_DYN: A Dynamic Microsimulation Model for the Italian Social Security System," Department of Economics 0595, University of Modena and Reggio E., Faculty of Economics "Marco Biagi".
    16. John Creedy & Alan S. Duncan & Mark Harris & Rosanna Scutella, 2002. "Microsimulation Modelling of Taxation and the Labour Market," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 2796.
    17. Ahmed, Vaqar & O' Donoghue, Cathal, 2007. "CGE-Microsimulation Modelling: A Survey," MPRA Paper 9307, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    18. Klevmarken, N. Anders & Bolin, Kristian & Eklöf, Matias & Flood, Lennart & Fransson, Urban & Hallberg, Daniel & Höjgård, Sören & Lindgren, Björn & Mitrut, Andrea & Lagergren, Mårten, 2007. "Simulating the future of the Swedish baby-boom generations," Working Paper Series 2007:26, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    19. Dekkers, Gijs, 2010. "On the impact of indexation and demographic ageing on inequality among pensioners," MPRA Paper 36136, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    20. Dekkers, G.J.M. & Nelissen, J.H.M. & Verbon, H.A.A., 1993. "The macro model programme sector of the microsimulation model NEDYMAS," WORC Paper 93.08.016/2, Tilburg University, Work and Organization Research Centre.
    21. Wolfson, Michael C, 1988. "Homemaker Pensions and Lifetime Redistribution," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 34(3), pages 221-250, September.
    22. Robert Tanton & Yogi Vidyattama & Binod Nepal & Justine McNamara, 2011. "Small area estimation using a reweighting algorithm," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(4), pages 931-951, October.
    23. Carl Emmerson & Howard Reed & Andrew Shephard, 2004. "An assessment of PenSim2," IFS Working Papers W04/21, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    24. Arthur van Soest, 1995. "Structural Models of Family Labor Supply: A Discrete Choice Approach," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(1), pages 63-88.
    25. Rebecca Cassells & Ann Harding & Simon Kelly, 2006. "Problems and Prospects for Dynamic Microsimulation: A review and lessons for APPSIM," NATSEM Working Paper Series 63, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    26. van de Ven, J., 1998. "A Dynamic Cohort Microsimulation Model," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 637, The University of Melbourne.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Matteo G. Richiardi, 2012. "Forecasting with Unobserved Heterogeneity," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 123, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    2. Franziska Gassmann & Cecile Cherrier & Andrés Mideros Mora & Pierre Mohnen, 2013. "Making the Investment Case for Social Protection: Methodological challenges with lessons learnt from a recent study in Cambodia," Papers inwopa694, Innocenti Working Papers.
    3. Alessandra Caretta & Sara Flisi & Cecilia Frale & Michele Raitano & Simone Tedeschi, 2013. "T-DYMM : the treasury dynamic microsimulation model of the Italian pension system," Working Papers 11, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    4. Mideros A. & Gassmann F. & Mohnen P., 2013. "Estimation of rates of return of social protection instruments. Making the case for non-contributory social transfers in Cambodia," MERIT Working Papers 063, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Dynamic Microsimulation; Survey;

    JEL classification:

    • C15 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Statistical Simulation Methods: General
    • C18 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Methodolical Issues: General
    • C50 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:unm:unumer:2012002. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Ad Notten). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/meritnl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.