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Mainstreaming New Renewable Energy Technologies

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  • Neuhoff, K.
  • Sellers, R.

Abstract

This paper outlines the benefits, obstacles and options for governments to support international markets for technology development. International markets for new energy technologies offer greater scope, thereby increasing the incentives and opportunities for technology improvements. As the market is supported by more independent governments, the confidence of technology developers and producers that future markets for their products will exist is increasing, thus enabling capital access and inducing R&D investment and exploration of improved production processes. The bigger markets also allow for international competition, thus allowing for the application of the best available technology. The government challenge to induce sufficient RD&D remains and with international markets the benefits and costs of national governments free-riding on international effort needs to be addressed. Finally, we discuss how international co-operation can be used to evolve the energy system in such a way that it can integrate new technologies at minimum cost.

Suggested Citation

  • Neuhoff, K. & Sellers, R., 2006. "Mainstreaming New Renewable Energy Technologies," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0624, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
  • Handle: RePEc:cam:camdae:0624
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    File URL: http://www.electricitypolicy.org.uk/pubs/wp/eprg0606.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bresnahan, Timothy F & Greenstein, Shane, 1999. "Technological Competition and the Structure of the Computer Industry," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(1), pages 1-40, March.
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    3. Anderson, Dennis & Bird, Catherine D, 1992. "Carbon Accumulations and Technical Progress--A Simulation Study of Costs," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 54(1), pages 1-29, February.
    4. Margolis, Robert M. & Kammen, Daniel M., 1999. "Evidence of under-investment in energy R&D in the United States and the impact of Federal policy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(10), pages 575-584, October.
    5. Karsten Neuhoff, 2005. "Large-Scale Deployment of Renewables for Electricity Generation," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(1), pages 88-110, Spring.
    6. Painuly, J.P, 2001. "Barriers to renewable energy penetration; a framework for analysis," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 73-89.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stenzel, Till & Frenzel, Alexander, 2008. "Regulating technological change--The strategic reactions of utility companies towards subsidy policies in the German, Spanish and UK electricity markets," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 2645-2657, July.
    2. Neuhoff, K., 2009. "Implementing the EU Renewables Directive," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0913, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Sirin, Selahattin Murat & Erdogan, Fakir H., 2013. "R&D expenditures in liberalized electricity markets: The case of Turkey," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 491-498.
    4. Sirin, Selahattin Murat, 2011. "Energy market reforms in Turkey and their impact on innovation and R&D expenditures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 4579-4585.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Energy technology; Research and development; Deployment;

    JEL classification:

    • Q42 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Alternative Energy Sources
    • L94 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Transportation and Utilities - - - Electric Utilities
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing

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