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Oil shocks and the UK economy: the changing nature of shocks and impact over time

Author

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  • Millard, Stephen

    (Bank of England)

  • Shakir, Tamarah

    (Bank of England)

Abstract

In this paper we examine how the impact of oil price movements on the UK economy differs depending on the underlying source of the shock, that is, whether the oil price has been driven by a supply, or demand, disturbance. In addition we employ an empirical framework with time-varying parameters to allow us to see how the impact of oil price shocks may have developed over time. In line with earlier studies on larger economies, we find that the source of the shock does indeed affect the size and nature of the eventual impact on the UK economy. Oil supply shocks typically lead to larger negative impacts on output and slightly higher increases in inflation relative to oil shocks stemming from shocks to world demand, which typically have smaller and largely positive, impacts on UK output. We find evidence that the nature of shocks in the world oil market has changed over time, with the oil price becoming more sensitive to changes in oil production. There is also evidence that the impact of oil shocks became much smaller from the mid-1980s onwards, although the impact has risen slightly since around 2004.

Suggested Citation

  • Millard, Stephen & Shakir, Tamarah, 2013. "Oil shocks and the UK economy: the changing nature of shocks and impact over time," Bank of England working papers 476, Bank of England.
  • Handle: RePEc:boe:boeewp:0476
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Imran Shah, 2012. "Revisiting the Dynamic Effects of Oil Price Shock on Small Developing Economies," Bristol Economics Discussion Papers 12/626, School of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
    2. Nonejad, Nima, 2020. "Crude oil price changes and the United Kingdom real gross domestic product growth rate: An out-of-sample investigation," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 21(C).
    3. Lorusso, Marco & Pieroni, Luca, 2018. "Causes and consequences of oil price shocks on the UK economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 223-236.
    4. Arestis, Philip & Gonzalez-Martinez, Ana Rosa, 2016. "Revisiting the accelerator principle in a world of uncertainty: Some empirical evidence," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 35-42.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Oil price shocks; time-varying parameter VARs;

    JEL classification:

    • Q43 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Energy and the Macroeconomy

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