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Risky Transportation Choices and the Value of Statistical Life

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  • Gianmarco León
  • Edward Miguel

Abstract

This paper exploits an unusual transportation setting to generate some of the first revealed preference value of a statistical life (VSL) estimates from a low-income setting. We estimate the trade-offs individuals are willing to make between mortality risk and cost as they travel to and from the international airport in Sierra Leone (which is separated from the capital Freetown by a body of water). We observe travelers choosing among multiple transport options - namely, ferry, helicopter, hovercraft, and water taxi. The setting and original dataset allow us to address some typical omitted variable concerns, and also to compare VSL estimates for travelers from dozens of countries, including both African and non-African countries, all facing the same choice situation. The average VSL estimate for African travelers in the sample is US$577,000 compared to US$924,000 for non-Africans. Individual characteristics, particularly job earnings and fatalistic attitudes, can largely account for this variation in the estimated VSL, but there is little evidence that estimates are driven by individuals' lack of information or predicted life expectancy. We estimate a large income elasticity of the VSL of +1.77. These VSL estimates fill an important gap in the existing literature, and can be used to inform public policy, including current debates within Sierra Leone regarding the desirability of constructing new transportation infrastructure.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianmarco León & Edward Miguel, 2015. "Risky Transportation Choices and the Value of Statistical Life," Working Papers 716, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:bge:wpaper:716
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    Cited by:

    1. Yao Yao, . "Fertility and HIV Risk in Africa," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Agamoni Majumder & S. Madheswaran, 2020. "Compensation for Occupational Risk and Valuation of Statistical Life," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 149(3), pages 967-989, June.
    3. Jonathan M. Lee & Laura O. Taylor, 2019. "Randomized Safety Inspections and Risk Exposure on the Job: Quasi-experimental Estimates of the Value of a Statistical Life," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 350-374, November.
    4. Jeremy Barofsky & Stephen D. Younger, 2019. "The Effect of Government Health Expenditure on the Income Distribution: A Comparison of Valuation Methods in Ghana," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 66, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    5. Shaun M. Da Costa, 2020. "The impact of the Ebola crisis on mortality and welfare in Liberia," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(12), pages 1517-1532, December.
    6. Paul H. Jung & Jean-Claude Thill & Luis Armando Galvis-Aponte, 2021. "State Failure, Violence, and Trade: Dangerous Trade Routes in Colombia," Documentos de Trabajo Sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 019925, Banco de la República - Economía Regional.
    7. Shaun Da Costa, 2021. "Estimating the welfare gains from antiretroviral therapy in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 2101, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    8. Christopher Hansman & Jonas Hjort & Gianmarco León, 2015. "Firm's response and unintended health consequences of industrial regulations," Economics Working Papers 1469, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    9. Castañeda Dower, Paul & Markevich, Andrei & Weber, Shlomo, 2021. "The value of a statistical life in a dictatorship: Evidence from Stalin," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 133(C).
    10. Paul H. Jung & Jean-Claude Thill & Luis Armando Galvis-Aponte, 2021. "State Failure, Violence, and Trade: Dangerous Trade Routes in Colombia," Documentos de trabajo sobre Economía Regional y Urbana 303, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    value of statistical life; risk taking behavior; Africa; Sierra Leone;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J17 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Value of Life; Foregone Income
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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