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Can Fiscal Budget-Neutral Reforms Stimulate Growth? Model-Based Results

Author

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  • M. Bussière
  • L. Ferrara
  • M. Juillard
  • D. Siena

Abstract

This paper focuses on growth enhancing budget-neutral fiscal reforms, i.e. changes in the composition of government revenues and spending that stimulate GDP growth while keeping the ratio of the fiscal budget to GDP constant. To this aim, we present simulation results using a multi-country DSGE model with three large economic regions, the US, the euro area and the rest of the world. The model features constrained and unconstrained non-Ricardian households and a detailed government sector; its multi-country nature allows investigating cross-country spillovers. The paper focuses on the most growth-friendly budget-neutral fiscal measures: (i) an incomplete fiscal devaluation (ii) a rise in government investment compensated by a fall in government consumption and (iii) a rise in government investment compensated by a rise in consumption and labor taxes. Dampening or amplifying effects due to coordination across policies (monetary and fiscal) and across economic regions are also considered. Three main results stand out. First, an increase in government investment financed by rising less distortionary taxes appears to be an effective growth-friendly budget-neutral reform in the sense that it generates both short- and long-run GDP growth and improves fiscal sustainability. Second, benefits and costs of budget-neutral reforms are not equally distributed across agents, giving rise to a policy trade-off between growth and distributional consequences. Third, budget-neutral reforms do not have large cross-border trade spillovers; however, reforms coordinated across all countries in periods of accommodative monetary policy do have amplified domestic effects.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Bussière & L. Ferrara & M. Juillard & D. Siena, 2017. "Can Fiscal Budget-Neutral Reforms Stimulate Growth? Model-Based Results," Working papers 625, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:625
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Font, Barbara Castelletti & Clerc, Pierrick & Lemoine, Matthieu, 2018. "Should euro area countries cut taxes on labour or capital in order to boost their growth?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 279-288.
    2. Luca Metelli & Filippo Natoli, 2019. "The international transmission of US tax shocks: a proxy-SVAR approach," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1223, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Natoli, Filippo & Metelli, Luca, 2018. "The international transmission of US fiscal shocks," MPRA Paper 84207, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fiscal composition; budget-neutral reforms; taxes; government spending; multi-country DSGE model; international spillovers.;

    JEL classification:

    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • E63 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Comparative or Joint Analysis of Fiscal and Monetary Policy; Stabilization; Treasury Policy
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission

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