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Shock Transmission through International Banks – Evidence from France

Author

Listed:
  • Bussière, M.
  • Camara, B.
  • Castellani, F.-D.
  • Potier, V.
  • Schmidt, J.

Abstract

As part of the International Banking Research Network, the Banque de France contribution to the research project on liquidity risk transmission concentrates on the “outward”' transmission of shocks affecting French banking groups. Using a rich dataset on their international positions, we analyze which balance sheet vulnerabilities contribute to the international transmission of aggregate liquidity risk shocks. The geographical breakdown of lending allows us to control for demand effects and to concentrate on the external adjustments to shocks affecting the supply of loans. We find that a higher capital ratio is associated with higher growth of lending abroad when aggregate liquidity conditions deteriorate. We find that our results are mainly driven by cross-border lending to the financial sector whereas local lending by foreign affiliates is hardly affected by the balance sheet shocks that the overall banking group is experiencing. We also investigate to what extent the identified effects differ depending on whether banks accessed public liquidity during the crisis and find that our baseline results are sensitive to the inclusion of central bank liquidity assistance.

Suggested Citation

  • Bussière, M. & Camara, B. & Castellani, F.-D. & Potier, V. & Schmidt, J., 2014. "Shock Transmission through International Banks – Evidence from France," Working papers 485, Banque de France.
  • Handle: RePEc:bfr:banfra:485
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S. Goldberg, 2012. "Follow the Money: Quantifying Domestic Effects of Foreign Bank Shocks in the Great Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 213-218, May.
    2. Giannetti, Mariassunta & Laeven, Luc, 2012. "The flight home effect: Evidence from the syndicated loan market during financial crises," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(1), pages 23-43.
    3. Berger, Allen N. & Bouwman, Christa H.S., 2013. "How does capital affect bank performance during financial crises?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 146-176.
    4. Claudia M Buch & Linda S Goldberg, 2015. "International Banking and Liquidity Risk Transmission: Lessons from Across Countries," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(3), pages 377-410, November.
    5. Rocco Huang & Lev Ratnovski, 2009. "Why Are Canadian Banks More Resilient?," IMF Working Papers 09/152, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Cetorelli, Nicola & Goldberg, Linda S., 2012. "Liquidity management of U.S. global banks: Internal capital markets in the great recession," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 299-311.
    7. Patrick McGuire & Goetz von Peter, 2009. "The US dollar shortage in global banking and the international policy response," BIS Working Papers 291, Bank for International Settlements.
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    9. Cornett, Marcia Millon & McNutt, Jamie John & Strahan, Philip E. & Tehranian, Hassan, 2011. "Liquidity risk management and credit supply in the financial crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(2), pages 297-312, August.
    10. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    11. Patrick McGuire & Goetz von Peter, 2009. "The US dollar shortage in global banking," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, March.
    12. Victoria Ivashina & David Scharfstein & Jeremy C. Stein, 2012. "Dollar funding and the lending behavior of global banks," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2012-74, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (US).
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudia M Buch & Linda S Goldberg, 2015. "International Banking and Liquidity Risk Transmission: Lessons from Across Countries," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(3), pages 377-410, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International banking; liquidity risk; shock transmission.;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • F36 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Financial Aspects of Economic Integration
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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