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Liquidity Risk and U.S. Bank Lending at Home and Abroad

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Abstract

While the balance sheet structure of U.S. banks influences how they respond to liquidity risks, the mechanisms for the effects on and consequences for lending vary widely across banks. We demonstrate fundamental differences across banks without foreign affiliates versus those with foreign affiliates. Among the nonglobal banks (those without a foreign affiliate), cross-sectional differences in response to liquidity risk depend on the banks' shares of core deposit funding. By contrast, differences across global banks (those with foreign affiliates) are associated with ex ante liquidity management strategies as reflected in internal borrowing across the global organization. This intra-firm borrowing by banks serves as a shock absorber and affects lending patterns to domestic and foreign customers. The use of official-sector emergency liquidity facilities by global and nonglobal banks in response to market liquidity risks tends to reduce the importance of ex ante differences in balance sheets as drivers of cross-sectional differences in lending.

Suggested Citation

  • Ricardo Correa & Linda S. Goldberg & Tara N. Rice, 2014. "Liquidity Risk and U.S. Bank Lending at Home and Abroad," International Finance Discussion Papers 1105, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgif:1105
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    1. Ricardo Correa & Horacio Sapriza & Andrei Zlate, 2012. "Liquidity shocks, dollar funding costs, and the bank lending channel during the European sovereign crisis," International Finance Discussion Papers 1059, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    2. Cetorelli, Nicola & Goldberg, Linda S., 2012. "Liquidity management of U.S. global banks: Internal capital markets in the great recession," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 299-311.
    3. Nicola Cetorelli & Linda S. Goldberg, 2012. "Follow the Money: Quantifying Domestic Effects of Foreign Bank Shocks in the Great Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 213-218, May.
    4. Nikolaou, Kleopatra & Drehmann, Mathias, 2009. "Funding liquidity risk: definition and measurement," Working Paper Series 1024, European Central Bank.
    5. Asim Ijaz Khwaja & Atif Mian, 2008. "Tracing the Impact of Bank Liquidity Shocks: Evidence from an Emerging Market," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(4), pages 1413-1442, September.
    6. Vitaly M. Bord & João A.C. Santos, 2014. "Banks' Liquidity and the Cost of Liquidity to Corporations," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(s1), pages 13-45, February.
    7. Morten L. Bech & Tara N. Rice, 2009. "Profits and balance sheet developments at U.S. commercial banks in 2008," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), vol. 95(6).
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    Cited by:

    1. Lee, Seungyoon & Bowdler, Christopher, 2019. "Banking sector globalization and monetary policy transmission: Evidence from Asian countries," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 101-116.
    2. Claudia M Buch & Linda S Goldberg, 2015. "International Banking and Liquidity Risk Transmission: Lessons from Across Countries," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 63(3), pages 377-410, November.
    3. Liu, Edith X. & Pogach, Jonathan, 2017. "The effect of foreign lending on domestic loans: An analysis of US global banks," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 151-154.
    4. Esther Segalla, 2015. "When Austrian banks cross borders," Financial Stability Report, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 29, pages 110-121.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    International banking; global banking; liquidity; transmission; internal capital market;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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