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Economic Determinants of Fertility in Belarus: a Micro-Data Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Aliaksandr Amialchuk
  • Maksim Yemelyanau
  • Katerina Lisenkova
  • Mykhaylo Salnykov

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of births in Belarus in 1996-2007 by using detailed micro data from the Belarusian Household Budget Surveys (BHBS). The literature offered several explanations of the recent trends in fertility in Belarus and in other former Soviet Union (FSU) countries. It was argued that the collapse of the Soviet Union and the concomitant economic instability reduced fertility in the 1990s, while the economic growth and stabilization were responsible for its recovery since 2005. We evaluate these hypotheses by looking at the determinants of the first, the second, and the third births, separately for women aged below 30 and above 30. We provide new evidence on the presence and the relative importance of the economic determinants, including income and wages, economic uncertainty, maternity and childcare benefits. Our findings can be incorporated in the future demographic policies in Belarus and other countries with similar experiences.

Suggested Citation

  • Aliaksandr Amialchuk & Maksim Yemelyanau & Katerina Lisenkova & Mykhaylo Salnykov, 2011. "Economic Determinants of Fertility in Belarus: a Micro-Data Analysis," BEROC Working Paper Series 13, Belarusian Economic Research and Outreach Center (BEROC).
  • Handle: RePEc:bel:wpaper:13
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    File URL: http://eng.beroc.by/webroot/delivery/files/WP13_eng_Amialchuk_Lisenkova_Salnykov_Yemelyanau.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2011
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ron Lesthaeghe & Paul Willems, 1999. "Is Low Fertility a Temporary Phenomenon in the European Union?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(2), pages 211-228.
    2. Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2012. "Determinants of Childbirth in Russia : A Micro-data Approach," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 53(1), pages 49-69, June.
    3. Pastore, Francesco & Verashchagina, Alina, 2008. "The Determinants of Female Labour Supply in Belarus," IZA Discussion Papers 3457, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 279-288, Part II, .
    5. Louise Grogan, 2006. "An Economic Examination of the Post-Transition Fertility Decline in Russia," Post-Communist Economies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 363-397.
    6. Jason M. Lindo, 2010. "Are Children Really Inferior Goods? Evidence from Displacement-Driven Income Shocks," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(2).
    7. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
    8. Zuzana Brixiova & Vera Volchok, 2005. "Labor Market Trends and Institutions in Belarus," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp777, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    9. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
    10. Siv Gustafsson, 2001. "Optimal age at motherhood. Theoretical and empirical considerations on postponement of maternity in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 225-247.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Belarus; low; fertility; economic transition;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • P0 - Economic Systems - - General
    • P13 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Cooperative Enterprises

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