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Lithuania: Fertility decline and its determinants

Author

Listed:
  • Vladislava Stankuniene

    (Lithuanian Social Research Centre)

  • Aiva Jasilioniene

    (Max-Planck-Institut für Demografische Forschung)

Abstract

Since the beginning of the 1990s, Lithuania has been undergoing significant transformations in family life and has experienced a precipitous decline in fertility. The determinants of the changes are diverse in character and are associated with socioeconomic transformations, economic difficulties faced by the post-Soviet society, inadequate social and family policies and changing value orientations and life styles. This article traces the fertility trends in Lithuania from the period and cohort perspective, providing adjusted TFR estimates that reveal the significance of the tempo effect on the recent decline in fertility. Furthermore, the main factors leading to the recently observed changes in family and fertility are identified and analysed. Finally, the characteristic features and necessary improvements of current Lithuanian family policy and its possible effects on individual behaviour and fertility trends are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Vladislava Stankuniene & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2008. "Lithuania: Fertility decline and its determinants," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(20), pages 705-742.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:20
    DOI: 10.4054/DemRes.2008.19.20
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Neyer, Gerda, 2003. "Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe," Discussion Paper 161, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zsolt Spéder & Balázs Kapitány, 2012. "Realising birth intentions in European comparison – understanding the postcommunist fertility transition," Working Papers on Population, Family and Welfare 15, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute.
    2. Tomáš Sobotka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 6: The diverse faces of the Second Demographic Transition in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(8), pages 171-224.
    3. Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Fertility Developments In Central And Eastern Europe: The Role Of Work–Family Tensions," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 54(5), pages 7-30.
    4. Tomas Frejka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(7), pages 139-170.
    5. Sunnee Billingsley, 2011. "Second and Third Births in Armenia and Moldova: An Economic Perspective of Recent Behaviour and Current Preferences [Deuxième et troisième naissance en Arménie et en Moldavie: Une approche économiq," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 27(2), pages 125-155, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    fertility; childbearing; Europe; fertility decline; Lithuania;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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