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Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe

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  • Tomas Frejka

    (Independent researcher)

Abstract

Societal conditions for early and high rates of childbearing were replaced by conditions generating late and low levels of fertility common in Western countries. Central among factors shaping the latter behaviour (job insecurity, unstable partnership relationships, expensive housing, and profound changes in norms, values and attitudes) were the following: increasing proportions of young people were acquiring advanced education, a majority of women were gainfully employed, yet women were performing most household maintenance and childrearing duties. Two theories prevailed to explain what caused changes in family formation and fertility trends. One argues that the economic and social crises were the principal causes. The other considered the diffusion of western norms, values and attitudes as the prime factors of change. Neither reveals the root cause: the replacement of state socialist regimes with economic and political institutions of contemporary capitalism. The extraordinarily low period TFRs around 2000 were the result of low fertility of older women born around 1960 overlapping with low fertility of young women born during the 1970s.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomas Frejka, 2008. "Overview Chapter 5: Determinants of family formation and childbearing during the societal transition in Central and Eastern Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(7), pages 139-170, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:19:y:2008:i:7
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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol19/7/19-7.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Irena E. Kotowska & Janina Jóźwiak & Anna Matysiak & Anna Baranowska-Rataj, 2008. "Poland: Fertility decline as a response to profound societal and labour market changes?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(22), pages 795-854, July.
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    4. Livia Sz. Oláh & Eva Bernhardt, 2008. "Sweden: Combining childbearing and gender equality," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(28), pages 1105-1144, July.
    5. Hans-Peter Kohler & Francesco C. Billari & José Antonio Ortega, 2002. "The Emergence of Lowest-Low Fertility in Europe During the 1990s," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(4), pages 641-680.
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    7. Cornelia Muresan & Paul-Teodor Hărăguş & Mihaela Hărăguş & Christin Schröder, 2008. "Romania: Childbearing metamorphosis within a changing context," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(23), pages 855-906, July.
    8. Alessandra De Rose & Filomena Racioppi & Anna Laura Zanatta, 2008. "Italy: Delayed adaptation of social institutions to changes in family behaviour," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(19), pages 665-704, July.
    9. Nada Stropnik & Milivoja Šircelj, 2008. "Slovenia: Generous family policy without evidence of any fertility impact," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(26), pages 1019-1058, July.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Fertility Developments In Central And Eastern Europe: The Role Of Work–Family Tensions," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 54(5), pages 7-30.
    2. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Women's determination to combine childbearing and paid employment: How can a qualitative approach help us understand quantitative evidence?," Working Papers 26, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    3. Anna Baranowska & Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Does parenthood increase happiness? Evidence for Poland," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 9(1), pages 307-325.
    4. repec:eur:ejesjr:55 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Anja Vatterrott, 2011. "The fertility behaviour of East to West German migrants," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2011-013, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Zsolt Spéder & Tamás Bartus, 2017. "Educational Enrolment, Double-Status Positions and the Transition to Motherhood in Hungary," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 55-85, February.
    7. Steinbach, Anja & Kuhnt, Anne-Kristin & Knüll, Markus, 2015. "Kern-, Eineltern- und Stieffamilien in Europa: Eine Analyse ihrer Häufigkeit und Einbindung in haushaltsübergreifende Strukturen," Duisburger Beiträge zur soziologischen Forschung 2015-02, University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Sociology.
    8. Júlia Mikolai, 2012. "With Or Without You. Partnership Context Of First Conceptions And Births In Hungary," Demográfia English Edition, Hungarian Demographic Research Institute, vol. 55(5), pages 37-60.
    9. repec:dem:demres:v:37:y:2017:i:12 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Tomas Frejka, 2016. "The demographic transition revisited: a cohort perspective," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2016-012, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Dimiter Philipov & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2008. "Union formation and fertility in Bulgaria and Russia: A life table description of recent trends," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(62), pages 2057-2114, December.
    12. Joshua R. Goldstein & Tomás Sobotka & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2009. "The End of "Lowest-Low" Fertility?," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(4), pages 663-699.
    13. Anna Matysiak, 2011. "Posiadanie w³asnego mieszkania a rodzicielstwo w Polsce," Working Papers 46, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Central Europe; childbearing; Eastern Europe; family; fertility;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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