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Education, labour, and the demographic consequences of birth postponement in Europe

Listed author(s):
  • Hippolyte d'Albis

    (École d'économie de Paris)

  • Angela Greulich

    (Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne)

  • Grégory Ponthière

    (École d'économie de Paris)

This paper questions the demographic consequences of birth postponement in Europe. Starting from the fact that there is no obvious link between the timing of first births and fertility levels in Europe, we deliver some indication that under certain circumstances, birth postponement involves the potential of facilitating rather than impedes starting a family. We apply a synthetic cohort approach and distinguish between different socio-economic determinants of the timing of first births by using the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions (EU-SILC). Data is compiled specifically to reduce endogeneity and to eliminate structure effects. We find that the probability of becoming a mother is higher for those women who postpone first childbirth due to education and career investment in comparison to those who postpone due to unrealized labour market integration. Educated and economically active women certainly postpone first childbirth in comparison to women who are less educated and who are not working, but they end up with a higher probability of starting a family in comparison to women who are less educated and not working. The article contributes to the academic discussion of the circumstances that may lead birth postponement to result in higher fertility for younger cohorts in European countries.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol36/23/36-23.pdf
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Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

Volume (Year): 36 (2017)
Issue (Month): 23 (February)
Pages: 691-728

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Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:36:y:2017:i:23
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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  23. repec:cai:poeine:pope_202_0301 is not listed on IDEAS
  24. Tomáš Sobotka & Vegard Skirbekk & Dimiter Philipov, 2011. "Economic Recession and Fertility in the Developed World," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 37(2), pages 267-306, June.
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