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The influence of employment uncertainty on childbearing in France: A tempo or quantum effect?

Author

Listed:
  • Ariane Pailhé

    (Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED))

  • Anne Solaz

    (Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED))

Abstract

This paper investigates whether unemployment and insecure employment periods merely delay fertility or also impact on completed fertility in France. It analyses both the timing of first childbearing and the fertility reached at age 40. Different indicators of declining employment security are used, i.e. current individual employment characteristics, the accumulation of unstable jobs, and aggregate-level indicators of employment uncertainty. Male unemployment has a negative influence on the timing of first childbearing, while periods of insecure employment delay fertility for women. Completed fertility is impacted by unemployment spells only for men who have faced long-term unemployment. Employment uncertainty thus tends to delay first parenthood but has a relatively weak effect on lifetime fertility in France. Generous state support to families associated with a generous unemployment insurance system, and the strong French two-child family norm may explain why economic uncertainty affects fertility less than elsewhere.

Suggested Citation

  • Ariane Pailhé & Anne Solaz, 2012. "The influence of employment uncertainty on childbearing in France: A tempo or quantum effect?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(1), pages 1-40, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:26:y:2012:i:1
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    File URL: https://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol26/1/26-1.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniele Vignoli & Letizia Mencarini & Giammarco Alderotti, 2018. "Is the Impact of Employment Uncertainty on Fertility Intentions Channeled by Subjective Well-Being?," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2018_04, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    2. Angela Greulich & Olivier Thevenon & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2015. "Securing women's employment: A fertility booster in European countries?," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01298946, HAL.
    3. Hippolyte D'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2015. "AVOIR UN ENFANT PLUS TARD Enjeux sociodémographiques du report des naissances," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01298929, HAL.
    4. Hippolyte d'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2017. "Education, labour, and the demographic consequences of birth postponement in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(23), pages 691-728, February.
    5. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0614-y is not listed on IDEAS
    6. repec:ces:ifobei:79 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:dem:demres:v:38:y:2018:i:19 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:spr:eurpop:v:34:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10680-017-9430-8 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Angela Greulich & Olivier Thevenon & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2016. "Securing women's employment: A fertility booster in European countries?," Working Papers hal-01298862, HAL.
    10. Daniel Ciganda, 2015. "Unstable work histories and fertility in France," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(28), pages 843-876, April.
    11. Arnaud Régnier-Loilier & Daniele Vignoli, 2014. "Similar incidence, different nature? Characteristics of Living Apart Together relationships in France and Italy," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2014_11, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    12. Angela Greulich & Olivier Thevenon & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, 2015. "Securing women's employment: A fertility booster in European countries?," Working Papers hal-01298946, HAL.
    13. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0580-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. repec:spr:eurpop:v:33:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10680-016-9408-y is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Marika Jalovaara & Anneli Miettinen, 2013. "Does his paycheck also matter?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(31), pages 881-916, April.
    16. Christelle Hamel & Ariane Pailhé, 2012. "Former une famille en contexte migratoire," Working Papers 181, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    17. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Gunnar Andersson, 2013. "Socioeconomic differences in the unemployment and fertility nexus: a comparison of Denmark and Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2013-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    18. Barbara Hofmann & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Arne Uhlendorff, 2017. "Job Displacement and First Birth Over the Business Cycle," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 54(3), pages 933-959, June.
    19. Daniele Vignoli & Valentina Tocchioni & Alessandra Mattei, 2018. "First-Birth Gains and Losses from the First Job in Italy: The Role of Employment Uncertainty," Econometrics Working Papers Archive 2018_02, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Statistica, Informatica, Applicazioni "G. Parenti".
    20. Alberto Cazzola & Lucia Pasquini & Aurora Angeli, 2016. "The relationship between unemployment and fertility in Italy," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(1), pages 1-38, January.
    21. repec:hal:journl:hal-01298929 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. repec:dem:demres:v:38:y:2018:i:30 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Lucia Granelli, 2017. "Family Tax Policy with Heterogeneous Altruistic Households," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2017019, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    24. Karin E. Lundström & Gunnar Andersson, 2012. "Labor-market status, migrant status and first childbearing in Sweden," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 27(25), pages 719-742, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    birth parity; event history analysis; fertility; gender; labor market; short-term employment; unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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