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A Demographic Explanation for the Recent Rise in European Fertility

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  • John Bongaarts
  • Tomáš Sobotka

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • John Bongaarts & Tomáš Sobotka, 2012. "A Demographic Explanation for the Recent Rise in European Fertility," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 38(1), pages 83-120, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:popdev:v:38:y:2012:i:1:p:83-120
    DOI: j.1728-4457.2012.00473.x
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1728-4457.2012.00473.x
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marion Burkimsher, 2017. "Evolution of the shape of the fertility curve: Why might some countries develop a bimodal curve?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 37(11), pages 295-324.
    2. Krystof Zeman & Eva Beaujouan & Zuzanna Brzozowska & Tomáš Sobotka, 2018. "Cohort fertility decline in low fertility countries: Decomposition using parity progression ratios," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(25), pages 651-690.
    3. Francisca Nordfalk & Ulla A. Hvidtfeldt & Niels Keiding, 2015. "TFR for males in Denmark," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(52), pages 1421-1434.
    4. Kuhn, Michael & Prettner, Klaus, 2016. "Growth and welfare effects of health care in knowledge-based economies," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 100-119.
    5. Mathías Nathan & Ignacio Pardo & Wanda Cabella, 2016. "Diverging patterns of fertility decline in Uruguay," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 34(20), pages 563-586.
    6. Piotr Dominiak & Ewa Lechman & Anna Okonowicz, 2015. "Fertility Rebound And Economic Growth. New Evidence For 18 Countries Over The Period 1970–2011," Equilibrium. Quarterly Journal of Economics and Economic Policy, Institute of Economic Research, vol. 10(1), pages 91-112, March.
    7. Hippolyte d'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2017. "Education, labour, and the demographic consequences of birth postponement in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(23), pages 691-728.
    8. Yoko Nakagaki, 2018. "Inverse J-Shaped Relationship between Fertility and Gender Equality: Different Relationships of the Two Variables According to Income Levels," Working Papers 165, JICA Research Institute.
    9. Hudde, Ansgar, 2016. "Fertility Is Low When There Is No Societal Agreement on a Specific Gender Role Model," EconStor Preprints 142175, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    10. Julia Hellstrand & Jessica Nisén & Vitor Miranda & Peter Fallesen & Lars Dommermuth & Mikko Myrskylä, 2020. "Not just later, but fewer: novel trends in cohort fertility in the Nordic countries," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2020-007, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Jonathan F. Fox & Sebastian Klüsener & Mikko Myrskylä, 2015. "Is a positive relationship between fertility and economic development emerging at the sub-national regional level? Theoretical considerations and evidence from Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2015-006, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Teresa Castro-Martín & Rafael Martín-García & Julia Cordero & Marta Seiz, 2021. "¿Cómo mejorar la natalidad en España?," Studies on the Spanish Economy eee2021-04, FEDEA.
    13. Federico Benassi & Luca Salvati, 2019. "Economic downturns and compositional effects in regional population structures by age: a multi-temporal analysis in Greek regions, 1981–2017," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 53(5), pages 2611-2633, September.
    14. Aude Bernard & Alina Pelikh, 2019. "Distinguishing tempo and ageing effects in migration," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 40(44), pages 1291-1322.
    15. Sam Hyun Yoo & Tomáš Sobotka, 2018. "Ultra-low fertility in South Korea: The role of the tempo effect," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(22), pages 549-576.
    16. Fox, Jonathan & Klüsener, Sebastian & Myrskylä, Mikko, 2018. "Is a positive relationship between fertility and economic development emerging at the sub-national regional level? Theoretical considerations and evidence from Europe," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 88295, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    17. Hippolyte d'Albis & Angela Greulich & Grégory Ponthière, 2017. "Education, labour, and the demographic consequences of birth postponement in Europe," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(23), pages 691-728.
    18. Papapetrou, Evangelia & Tsalaporta, Pinelopi, 2020. "The impact of population aging in rich countries: What’s the future?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 77-95.
    19. Stuart Basten & Georgia Verropoulou, 2015. "A Re-Interpretation of the ‘Two-child Norm’ in Post-Transitional Demographic Systems: Fertility Intentions in Taiwan," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 10(8), pages 1-16, August.
    20. Ronald R. Rindfuss & Minja Kim Choe & Sarah R. Brauner-Otto, 2016. "The Emergence of Two Distinct Fertility Regimes in Economically Advanced Countries," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 35(3), pages 287-304, June.
    21. Eunkoo Lee, 2018. "Educational differences in period fertility: The case of South Korea, 1996–2010," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 38(13), pages 309-320.
    22. García-Manglano, Javier & Nollenberger, Natalia & Sevilla, Almudena, 2014. "Gender, Time-Use, and Fertility Recovery in Industrialized Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 8613, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    23. Johannes Huinink & Martin Kohli & Jens Ehrhardt, 2015. "Explaining fertility: The potential for integrative approaches," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(4), pages 93-112.

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