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Labor Market Trends and Institutions in Belarus

  • Zuzana Brixiova


  • Vera Volchok

In most countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States, the transition to market led to the emergence of a private sector and open unemployment. The Belarusian labor market is characterized by low official unemployment, combined with a low share of the private sector in the aggregate employment. However, the cumulative fall in employment since 1990 has been similar to other transition economies, leading to a sharp reduction of labor force, and the youth unemployment remains high. The mismatch in skills between the unemployed and the vacancies and the geographical mismatch suggest that policies aimed at improving skills and increasing mobility are needed. At the same time, the low vacancy-unemployment ratio calls for policies aimed at encouraging private job creation. An immediate policy concern for the government is to launch a labor market reform that would balance providing adequate protection for workers with the need to design the incentives for the unemployed workers to search for new jobs.

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Paper provided by William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan in its series William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series with number wp777.

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Length: pages
Date of creation: 01 Jun 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2005-777
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  1. Wenli Li & Zuzana Brixiova & Tarik Yousef, 1999. "Skill Acquisition and Firm Creation in Transition Economies," IMF Working Papers 99/130, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Viliam Druska & Byeong ju Jeong & Michal Kejak & Viatcheslav Vinogradov, 2002. "Assessing the Problem of Human Capital Mismatch in Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 467, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
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