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Assessing the Problem of Human Capital Mismatch in Transition Economies

Author

Listed:
  • Viliam Druska
  • Byeong ju Jeong
  • Michal Kejak
  • Viatcheslav Vinogradov

Abstract

In transition economies, there may be a significant mismatch between the types of skills that workers possess and the types of skills that the new economy demands. We consider this problem of human capital mismatch along the dimensions of training type (holding the level) and occupation. We document that in the Czech Republic and Poland the wage rate grew faster in business occupations than in technical occupations in the 1990's, and that in response the technical training/occupations contracted while the business training/occupations expanded. We do not find this pattern in Hungary. We construct a neoclassical model with endogenous occupational choice and calibrate it to the Czech and Polish data. We estimate that the discounted sum of output loss due to human capital mismatch amounts to 44% of the aggregate output of the beginning year of transition.

Suggested Citation

  • Viliam Druska & Byeong ju Jeong & Michal Kejak & Viatcheslav Vinogradov, 2002. "Assessing the Problem of Human Capital Mismatch in Transition Economies," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 467, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2002-467
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39851/2/wp467.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sorm, Vit & Terrell, Katherine, 2000. "Sectoral Restructuring and Labor Mobility: A Comparative Look at the Czech Republic," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 431-455, September.
    2. Alfonso Alba-Ramírez, 1993. "Mismatch in the Spanish Labor Market: Overeducation?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(2), pages 259-278.
    3. Daron Acemoglu & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2001. "Productivity Differences," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(2), pages 563-606.
    4. Boeri, Tito & Flinn, Christopher J., 1999. "Returns to Mobility in the Transition to a Market Economy," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 4-32, March.
    5. Klara Z. Sabirianova, 2000. "The Great Human Capital Reallocation: An Empirical Analysis of Occupational Mobility in Transitional Russia," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 309, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    6. Barro, Robert J & Lee, Jong Wha, 1996. "International Measures of Schooling Years and Schooling Quality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 218-223, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Spagat, Michael, 2006. "Human capital and the future of transition economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 44-56, March.
    2. Irina Soboleva, 2011. "Patterns of Human Capital Development in Russia: Meeting the Challenge of Market Reforms and Globalization," Institutions and Economies (formerly known as International Journal of Institutions and Economies), Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, vol. 3(2), pages 235-257, July.
    3. Zuzana Brixiova & Vera Volchok, 2005. "Labor Market Trends and Institutions in Belarus," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp777, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Kevin Denny & Orla Doyle, 2005. "Returns to basic skills in Central & Eastern Europe : a semi parametric approach," Working Papers 200507, School of Economics, University College Dublin.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    human capital; mismatch; occupation; training;

    JEL classification:

    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population
    • E13 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Neoclassical

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