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Assessing the macroeconomic impact of Brexit through trade and migration channels

Author

Listed:
  • Antoine Berthou

    (Banque de France)

  • Sophie Haincourt

    (Banque de France)

  • Marie-Elisabeth de la Serve

    (Banque de France)

  • Ángel Estrada

    () (Banco de España)

  • Moritz A. Roth

    () (Banco de España)

  • Alexander Kadow

    (Deutsche Bundesbank)

Abstract

This joint work by the Bundesbank, the Banque de France and the Banco de España highlights some of the numerous channels through which Brexit will affect the UK economy and its economic partners. In particular, it focuses on trade and migration channels, adding a more general assessment of exiting the EU through the use of a gravity model. The trade cannel alone may cut UK GDP by 2% over the medium term if the UK reverts to WTO rules, while a more general gravity model would point to UK GDP falling by almost 6% compared to baseline. According to our analysis, the ‘cost of non-Europe’ (such as originally stated by Cecchini’s seminal work in 1988) lies therefore between 2% and 6% in terms of real GDP losses for the UK. With the shock being largely asymmetric, the EA remains relatively unscathed by the UK’s exit, with GDP less than 1% lower than baseline by 2023. The study also shows that results are sensitive to the envisaged policy response. In general, monetary and fiscal policies may act to cushion a Brexit-related shock; however, the potency of the policy response depends on the underlying source of the shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Antoine Berthou & Sophie Haincourt & Marie-Elisabeth de la Serve & Ángel Estrada & Moritz A. Roth & Alexander Kadow, 2019. "Assessing the macroeconomic impact of Brexit through trade and migration channels," Occasional Papers 1911, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.
  • Handle: RePEc:bde:opaper:1911
    as

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    File URL: https://www.bde.es/f/webbde/SES/Secciones/Publicaciones/PublicacionesSeriadas/DocumentosOcasionales/19/Files/do1911e.pdf
    File Function: First version, May 2019
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Buesa & Coral García & Iván Kataryniuk & César Martín-Machuca & Susana Moreno & Moritz Roth, 2020. "Brexit: situation and economic consequences," Economic Bulletin, Banco de España;Economic Bulletin Homepage, issue 4/2020, pages 1-12.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Brexit; NiGEM; trade; tariffs; non-tariff trade barriers; migration; scenario analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • F42 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - International Policy Coordination and Transmission
    • F53 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Agreements and Observance; International Organizations

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