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Is temporary employment a cause or consequence of poor mental health?

Listed author(s):
  • Chris Dawson

    (School of Management, University of Bath, UK)

  • Michail Veliziotis

    (Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK)

  • Gail Pacheco

    ()

    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Business and Law, Auckland University of Technology)

  • Don Webber

    (Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, University of the West of England, Bristol, UK)

Mental health status often has a strong association with labour market outcomes. If people in temporary employment have poorer mental health than those in permanent employment then it is consistent with two mutually inclusive possibilities: temporary employment generates adverse mental health effects and/or individuals with poorer mental health select into temporary from permanent employment. We reveal that permanent workers with poor mental health appear to select into temporary employment thus signalling that prior cross sectional studies may overestimate the influence of employment type on mental health. We also reveal that this selection effect is significantly mitigated by job satisfaction.

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File URL: http://www.aut.ac.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/501434/Economics-WP-2014-06.pdf
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Paper provided by Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2014-06.

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Length: 31 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2014
Handle: RePEc:aut:wpaper:201406
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  1. Gash, Vanessa & Mertens, Antje & Romeu Gordo, Laura, 2006. "Are fixed-term jobs bad for your health? A comparison between Western Germany and Spain," Working Papers 27, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute of Management Berlin (IMB).
  2. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
  3. Jones, Andrew M. & Rice, Nigel & Roberts, Jennifer, 2010. "Sick of work or too sick to work? Evidence on self-reported health shocks and early retirement from the BHPS," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 866-880, July.
  4. Alison L. Booth & Marco Francesconi & Jeff Frank, 2002. "Temporary Jobs: Stepping Stones Or Dead Ends?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(480), pages 189-213, June.
  5. Silvana Robone & Andrew Jones & Nigel Rice, 2011. "Contractual conditions, working conditions and their impact on health and well-being," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 12(5), pages 429-444, October.
  6. Butler, J S, et al, 1987. "Measurement Error in Self-reported Health Variables," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(4), pages 644-650, November.
  7. David Madden, 2010. "Gender Differences in Mental Well-Being: a Decomposition Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 99(1), pages 101-114, October.
  8. Jeroen de Jong, 2009. "Motives for accepting temporary employment: a typology," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 30(3), pages 237-252, June.
  9. Colin P. Green & John S. Heywood, 2011. "Flexible Contracts And Subjective Well‐Being," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(3), pages 716-729, 07.
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