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Labor productivity in Europe: Evidence from a sample of regions



The present paper aims at analyzing the sources of productivity in Europe to account for its recent underperformance and identify potential geographic idiosyncracies. We study the productivity performance and its sources in a sample of ten European regions belonging to four countries (France, Germany, Italy and Spain). Exploiting the increasing availability of disaggregated data at regional level in Europe, we propose both a descriptive statistics and an econometric analysis of productivity sources since 1995. Our main finding is that the sources of labor productivity are rather heterogeneous across our sample but may be associated with regional or national idiosyncracies.

Suggested Citation

  • Lionel Artige & Rosella Nicolini, 2006. "Labor productivity in Europe: Evidence from a sample of regions," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 661.06, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
  • Handle: RePEc:aub:autbar:661.06

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Fatas, Antonio, 1997. "EMU: Countries or regions? Lessons from the EMS experience," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 743-751, April.
    2. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Overman, Henry G., 2004. "The spatial distribution of economic activities in the European Union," Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics,in: J. V. Henderson & J. F. Thisse (ed.), Handbook of Regional and Urban Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 64, pages 2845-2909 Elsevier.
    3. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 1999. "Convergence or Divergence? Types of Regional Responses to Socio-Economic Change in Western Europe," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 90(4), pages 365-378, November.
    4. Puga, Diego, 1999. "The rise and fall of regional inequalities," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 303-334, February.
    5. Olivier Blanchard, 2004. "The Economic Future of Europe," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 18(4), pages 3-26, Fall.
    6. Bart Hobijn & Boyan Jovanovic, 2001. "The Information-Technology Revolution and the Stock Market: Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1203-1220, December.
    7. Marcello M. Estevão, 2004. "Why is Productivity Growth in the Euro Area so Sluggish?," IMF Working Papers 04/200, International Monetary Fund.
    8. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Montserrat Vilalta-Bufí, 2005. "Education, migration, and job satisfaction: the regional returns of human capital in the EU," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 5(5), pages 545-566, October.
    9. Danny Quah, 1997. "Regional Convergence from LocalIsolated Actions: I Historical Outcomes," CEP Discussion Papers dp0378, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    Cited by:

    1. Anneli Kaasa, 2016. "Culture, religion and productivity: Evidence from European regions," Business and Economic Horizons (BEH), Prague Development Center, vol. 12(1), pages 11-28, April.
    2. Amjad Naveed & Nisar Ahmad, 2016. "Labour productivity convergence and structural changes: simultaneous analysis at country, regional and industry levels," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, December.

    More about this item


    Labor productivity; productivity determinants; European regions;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe

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