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GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in Italy

Author

Listed:
  • Gabriele Ballarino

    () (Dipartimento di Studi del Lavoro)

  • Michela Braga

    () (Facolta' di Scienze Politiche (DEAS), Universita' degli Studi di Milano)

  • Massimiliano Bratti

    () (Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche Aziendali e Stastistiche (DEAS), University of Milan)

  • Daniele Checchi

    () (Universita'degli Studi di Milano, Facolta'di Scienze)

  • Antonio Filippin

    () (Department of Economics and Business, University of Milan, IZA)

  • Carlo V. Fiorio

    () (Econpubblica, Room 3.B1 13, Bocconi University)

  • Marco Leonardi

    (University of Milan)

  • Elena Meschi

    () (Institute of Education ,Room 405, University of London)

  • Francesco Scervini

    () (Collegio Carlo Alberto, Università degli Studi, Torino)

Abstract

There are two main dimensions of inequality in Italy. On one side, there is geography. The sharp division between a more developed North and a backwards South has been a central feature of the country since the birth of the Italian national state, and is still, a central topic of Italian politics and public discussion. The weakness of the state is the second major reason to explain the relatively high level of inequality observed in contemporary Italy. On one side, the inefficiency of the state directly condemns to failure any redistributive policy aimed at effectively reducing income inequality and other kinds of inequality. On the other side, the weakness of the state indirectly increases social inequality, as it is complemented by individualistic, market-based mobilization and by the strength of particular social groups. Among the latter, the most important is surely the family, but also trade unions, employers’ association and the professions have played a strong role in Italian politics.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriele Ballarino & Michela Braga & Massimiliano Bratti & Daniele Checchi & Antonio Filippin & Carlo V. Fiorio & Marco Leonardi & Elena Meschi & Francesco Scervini, 2013. "GINI Country Report: Growing Inequalities and their Impacts in Italy," GINI Country Reports italy, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:aia:ginicr:italy
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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