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Agriculture and global climate stabilization: a public good analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Quiggin, John

The stabilization of global climate presents one of the most complex problems in public good provision the world has faced. Continuation of ‘business as usual’ policies, leading to warming of more than 2 degrees over the next year, will produce significant damage to agricultural systems and catastrophic damage to the natural ecosystems that ultimately support agriculture. The best solution to the public goods problem is a ‘contract and converge’ agreement in which the ultimate outcome is a common global entitlement to CO2 emissions per person.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/152095
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Paper provided by University of Queensland, School of Economics in its series Risk and Sustainable Management Group Working Papers with number 152095.

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Date of creation: 08 Aug 2009
Handle: RePEc:ags:uqsers:152095
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  1. Guoju, Xiao & Weixiang, Liu & Qiang, Xu & Zhaojun, Sun & Jing, Wang, 2005. "Effects of temperature increase and elevated CO2 concentration, with supplemental irrigation, on the yield of rain-fed spring wheat in a semiarid region of China," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 243-255, June.
  2. David Adamson & Thilak Mallawaarachchi & John Quiggin, 2009. "Declining inflows and more frequent droughts in the Murray-Darling Basin: climate change, impacts and adaptation ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 53(3), pages 345-366, July.
  3. John Quiggin & David Adamson & Sarah Chambers & Peggy Schrobback, 2010. "Climate Change, Uncertainty, and Adaptation: The Case of Irrigated Agriculture in the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 58(s1), pages 531-554, December.
  4. Stern, David I., 2004. "The Rise and Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1419-1439, August.
  5. Gallagher, Paul W., 2006. "Energy Production with Biomass: What Are the Prospects?," ISU General Staff Papers 200601010800001446, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  6. Martin L. Weitzman, 2007. "A Review of the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 45(3), pages 703-724, September.
  7. Flowerdew, Robin & Green, Mick, 1992. "Developments in Areal Interpolation Methods and GIS," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 26(1), pages 67-78, April.
  8. Susmita Dasgupta & Benoit Laplante & Hua Wang & David Wheeler, 2002. "Confronting the Environmental Kuznets Curve," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 147-168, Winter.
  9. Gallagher, Paul W., 2006. "Energy Production with Biomass: What Are the Prospects," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12559, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
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