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Does Food Safety Conflict With Food Security? The Safe Consumption Of Food

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  • Kinsey, Jean D.

Abstract

This paper concludes by saying no, food safety and security reinforce each other. It combines food safety and food security into the concept of "safe food consumption." Unsafe food consumption occurs when food contains known substances that lead to short or long term illness or death (botulism) and suspect substances that are believed to lead to delayed diseases (pesticides). It also occurs when hunger or over eating contribute to long-term illness and shorter life expectancy. The costs of illnesses related to obesity are six to fourteen times as great as the costs attributed to food born illnesses caused by microbial contamination. The implications for health care costs due to Type 2 Diabetes alone make this a health crisis in slow motion. Obesity is not a problem unique to westernized countries. On balance, 8.2 percent of the world's population is obese while 5.8 percent are underweight. The magnitude of these dual food and diet issues clearly poses new challenges for global food policy and food security. Unsafe food eaten by poor people jeopardizes their health as surely as too little food. These concepts operate in tandem. Hunger and being overweight often co-exist in the same household which jeopardizes ones ability to earn income and in turn, purchase healthy food. Safe food consumption is compatible and consistent with food security in all parts of the world. The costs of illnesses related to obesity are six to fourteen times as great as the costs attributed food born illnesses caused by microbial contamination. The implications for health care costs due to Type 2 Diabetes alone make this an health crisis is slow motion. Obesity is not a problem unique to westernized countries. On balance 8.2 percent of the world's population is obese while 5.8 percent are underweight. The magnitude of these dual food and diet issues clearly poses new challenges for global food policy and food security. Unsafe food eaten by poor people jeopardizes their health as surely as too little food. These concepts operate in tandem. Hunger and being overweight often co-exist in the same household which jeopardizes ones ability to earn income and in turn, purchase healthy food. Safe food consumption is compatible and consistent with food security in all parts of the world.

Suggested Citation

  • Kinsey, Jean D., 2004. "Does Food Safety Conflict With Food Security? The Safe Consumption Of Food," Working Papers 14326, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:umrfwp:14326
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/14326/files/tr04-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Antle, John M., 2001. "Economic analysis of food safety," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 19, pages 1083-1136 Elsevier.
    2. Garrett, James L. & Ruel, Marie T., 2003. "Stunted child - overweight mother pairs," FCND discussion papers 148, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Ollinger, Michael & Mueller, Valerie, 2003. "Managing For Safer Food: The Economics Of Sanitation And Process Controls In Meat And Poultry Plants," Agricultural Economics Reports 33975, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2002. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2001," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33865, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2009. "Household Food Security in the United States, 2008," Economic Research Report 55953, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Cited by:

    1. Campo, Isabelle Schluep, 2005. "Economic Aspects of Food Safety and Nutritional Behaviour: A Research Agenda," Agrarwirtschaft und Agrarsoziologie\ Economie et Sociologie Rurales, Swiss Society for Agricultural Economics and Rural Sociology, vol. 2005(Number 1), pages 1-20.

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