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Household Food Security in the United States, 2008

Author

Listed:
  • Nord, Mark
  • Andrews, Margaret S.
  • Carlson, Steven

Abstract

Eighty-five percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2008, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.6 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.7 percent with very low food security—meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food. Prevalence rates of food insecurity and very low food security were up from 11.1 percent and 4.1 percent, respectively, in 2007, and were the highest recorded since 1995, when the first national food security survey was conducted. The typical food-secure household spent 31 percent more on food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and household composition. Fifty-five percent of all food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest Federal food and nutrition assistance programs during the month prior to the 2008 survey.

Suggested Citation

  • Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2009. "Household Food Security in the United States, 2008," Economic Research Report 55953, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:55953
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/55953/files/ERR83%20full%20doc.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Andrews, Margaret S. & Nord, Mark, 2001. "Food Security Is Improving in the United States," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33641, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Nord, Mark, 2005. "Measuring U.S. Household Food Security," Amber Waves:The Economics of Food, Farming, Natural Resources, and Rural America, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, pages 1-2, April.
    3. Parke Wilde & Mark Nord, 2005. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Food Security: A Panel Data Approach ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 425-432.
    4. Unknown, 2001. "Second Food Security Measurement And Research Conference, Volume Ii: Papers," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33883, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Joshua Winicki & Kyle Jemison, 2003. "Food Insecurity and Hunger in the Kindergarten Classroom: Its Effect on Learning and Growth," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 21(2), pages 145-157, April.
    6. Craig Gundersen & Victor Oliveira, 2001. "The Food Stamp Program and Food Insufficiency," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 875-887.
    7. repec:oup:revage:v:27:y:2005:i:3:p:425-432. is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Unknown, 2001. "Second Food Security Measurement And Research Conference, Volume I: Proceedings," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33809, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Oluyemisi Kuku & Steven Garasky & Craig Gundersen, 2012. "The relationship between childhood obesity and food insecurity: a nonparametric analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(21), pages 2667-2677, July.
    2. Daniel Millimet & Manan Roy, 2015. "Partial identification of the long-run causal effect of food security on child health," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 48(1), pages 83-141, February.
    3. Jessica Crowe & Justin Smith, 2011. "The influence of community capital toward a community's capacity to respond to food insecurity," Community Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 169-186, March.
    4. James Mabli & David Jones, "undated". "Food Security and Food Access Among Emergency Food Pantry Households," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 2e56d4764c4d4c498b714bc74, Mathematica Policy Research.
    5. Dean, Wesley R. & Sharkey, Joseph R., 2011. "Food insecurity, social capital and perceived personal disparity in a predominantly rural region of Texas: An individual-level analysis," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(9), pages 1454-1462, May.
    6. Steven Pressman, 2011. "How Poor Are America's Poor?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 54(2), pages 109-121.
    7. Davis, David & Huang, Rui, 2013. "The Effect of SNAP Benefits for Food Insecurity," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149827, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2007. "Household Food Security in the United States, 2006," Economic Research Report 55966, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. repec:spr:soinre:v:138:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-017-1700-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Yonatan Ben-Shalom & Mary Kay Fox & P.K. Newby, 2012. "Characteristics and Dietary Patterns of Healthy and Less-Healthy Eaters in the Low-Income Population," Mathematica Policy Research Reports c1f41b94fe40412fb98089df5, Mathematica Policy Research.
    11. Nord, Mark & Parker, Lynn, 2010. "How adequately are food needs of children in low-income households being met?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1175-1185, September.
    12. Megan Carney, 2012. "Compounding crises of economic recession and food insecurity: a comparative study of three low-income communities in Santa Barbara County," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(2), pages 185-201, June.
    13. repec:eee:cysrev:v:76:y:2017:i:c:p:203-212 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2002. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2001," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33865, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    15. Davis, David E. & Huang, Rui, 2013. "The Real Effect of SNAP Benefits for Food Insecurity," SDSU Working Papers in Progress 13001, South Dakota State University, Department of Economics.
    16. Chung, Yiyoon, 2015. "Does SNAP serve as a safety net for mothers facing an economic shock? An analysis of Black and White unwed mothers' responses to paternal imprisonment," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 179-192.
    17. Ranney, Christine K. & Gomez, Miguel I., 2010. "Food Stamps, Food Insufficiency and Health of the Elderly," Working Papers 126968, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
    18. Carter, Kristie N. & Kruse, Kerri & Blakely, Tony & Collings, Sunny, 2011. "The association of food security with psychological distress in New Zealand and any gender differences," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 72(9), pages 1463-1471, May.
    19. Lucie Schmidt & Lara Shore-Sheppard & Tara Watson, 2016. "The Effect of Safety-Net Programs on Food Insecurity," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(3), pages 589-614.
    20. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2004. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2003," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33835, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    21. Kinsey, Jean D., 2004. "Does Food Safety Conflict With Food Security? The Safe Consumption Of Food," Working Papers 14326, University of Minnesota, The Food Industry Center.

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