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Household Food Security in the United States in 2010

Author

Listed:
  • Coleman-Jensen, Alisha
  • Nord, Mark
  • Andrews, Margaret S.
  • Carlson, Steven

Abstract

An estimated 85.5 percent of American households were food secure throughout the entire year in 2010, meaning that they had access at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life for all household members. The remaining households (14.5 percent) were food insecure at least some time during the year, including 5.4 percent with very low food security—meaning that the food intake of one or more household members was reduced and their eating patterns were disrupted at times during the year because the household lacked money and other resources for food. The prevalence rate of very low food security declined from 5.7 percent in 2009, while the change in food insecurity overall (from 14.7 percent in 2009) was not statistically significant. The typical food-secure household spent 27 percent more on food than the typical food-insecure household of the same size and household composition. Fifty-nine percent of all food-insecure households participated in one or more of the three largest Federal food and nutrition assistance programs during the month prior to the 2010 survey.

Suggested Citation

  • Coleman-Jensen, Alisha & Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2011. "Household Food Security in the United States in 2010," Economic Research Report 118021, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersrr:118021
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/118021
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Nord, Mark, 2009. "Food Spending Declined and Food Insecurity Increased for Middle-Income and Low-Income Households From 2000 to 2007," Economic Information Bulletin 56627, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    2. Andrews, Margaret S. & Nord, Mark, 2001. "Food Security Is Improving in the United States," Agricultural Information Bulletins 33641, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    3. Bruce D. Meyer & Wallace K. C. Mok & James X. Sullivan, 2009. "The Under-Reporting of Transfers in Household Surveys: Its Nature and Consequences," Working Papers 0903, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
    4. Nord, Mark, 2009. "Food Insecurity in Households with Children: Prevalence, Severity, and Household Characteristics," Economic Information Bulletin 58616, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    5. Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2002. "Household Food Security In The United States, 2001," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33865, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    6. Nord, Mark, 2005. "Measuring U.S. Household Food Security," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, April.
    7. Parke Wilde & Mark Nord, 2005. "The Effect of Food Stamps on Food Security: A Panel Data Approach ," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 425-432.
    8. Nord, Mark & Golla, Anne Marie, 2009. "Does SNAP Decrease Food Insecurity? Untangling the Self-Selection Effect," Economic Research Report 55955, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Craig Gundersen & Victor Oliveira, 2001. "The Food Stamp Program and Food Insufficiency," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(4), pages 875-887.
    10. Nord, Mark & Bickel, Gary, 2002. "Measuring Children'S Food Security In U.S. Households, 1995-99," Food Assistance and Nutrition Research Reports 33801, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. Steven T. Yen & Margaret Andrews & Zhuo Chen & David B. Eastwood, 2008. "Food Stamp Program Participation and Food Insecurity: An Instrumental Variables Approach," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(1), pages 117-132.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Food security; food insecurity; food spending; food pantry; soup kitchen; emergency kitchen; material well-being; SNAP; Food Stamp Program; National School Lunch Program; WIC; Food Security and Poverty;

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