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Food Insecurity in Households with Children: Prevalence, Severity, and Household Characteristics

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  • Nord, Mark

Abstract

Eighty-four percent of U.S. households with children were food secure throughout 2007, meaning that they had consistent access to adequate food for active, healthy lives for all household members. Nearly 16 percent of households with children were food insecure sometime during the year, including 8.3 percent in which children were food insecure and 0.8 percent in which one or more children experienced very low food security—the most severe food-insecure condition measured by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Numerous studies suggest that children in food-insecure households have higher risks of health and development problems than children in otherwise similar food-secure households. This study found that about 85 percent of households with food-insecure children had a working adult, including 70 percent with a full-time worker. Fewer than half of households with food-insecure children included an adult educated past high school. Thus, job opportunities and wage rates for less educated workers are important factors affecting the food security of children. In 2007, Federal food and nutrition assistance programs provided benefits to four out of five low-income, food-insecure households with children.

Suggested Citation

  • Nord, Mark, 2009. "Food Insecurity in Households with Children: Prevalence, Severity, and Household Characteristics," Economic Information Bulletin 58616, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:58616
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58616
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Jun & Yen, Steven T., 2017. "Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and food insecurity among families with children," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 52-64.
    2. Houston, Jack E. & Marzette, Audrianna A. & Ames, Glenn C.W. & Ames, Allison Jennifer, 2013. "Food Insecurity, the National School Lunch Program and Educational Achievement: Evidence from Georgia's Public Schools," Journal of Food Distribution Research, Food Distribution Research Society, vol. 44(1), March.
    3. Morrissey, Taryn W. & Oellerich, Don & Meade, Erica & Simms, Jeffrey & Stock, Ann, 2016. "Neighborhood poverty and children's food insecurity," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 85-93.
    4. repec:mpr:mprres:7963 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Zhang, Jun & Yen, Steven, 2014. "Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Food Insecurity among Families with Children," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 167477, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Ames, Allison Jennifer & Ames, Glenn C.W. & Houston, Jack E. & Angioloni, Simone, 2013. "Food Insecurity and Educational Achievement: A Multilevel Generalization of Poisson Regression," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150167, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Coleman-Jensen, Alisha & Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2011. "Household Food Security in the United States in 2011," Economic Research Report 134715, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Jessica E. Todd, 2015. "Revisiting the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program cycle of food intake: Investigating heterogeneity, diet quality, and a large boost in benefit amounts," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 37(3), pages 437-458.
    9. repec:mpr:mprres:8084 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Coleman-Jensen, Alisha & Nord, Mark & Andrews, Margaret S. & Carlson, Steven, 2011. "Household Food Security in the United States in 2010," Economic Research Report 118021, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    11. Ames, Allison Jennifer & Ames, Glenn Clifford Webster & Houston, Jack Erwin & Angioloni, Simone, 0. "Food Insecurity And Educational Achievement: A Multi-Level Generalization Of Poisson Regression," International Journal of Food and Agricultural Economics (IJFAEC), Alanya Alaaddin Keykubat University, Department of Economics and Finance, vol. 4.
    12. Nord, Mark & Parker, Lynn, 2010. "How adequately are food needs of children in low-income households being met?," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 32(9), pages 1175-1185, September.

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