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Effect of Remittance on Intensity of Agricultural Technology Adoption in Nepal

Listed author(s):
  • Pandit, Mahesh
  • Paudel, Krishna P.
  • Williams, Deborah

We analyzed data collected from face to face interviews of farmers in East Chitwan, Nepal to understand the factors affecting the intensity of improved agriculture technologies adoption. We used parametric and nonparametric instrument variable count data models. Results from the Poisson Quasi Likelihood model indicated the positive role of remittance payment on agricultural technology adoption, consistent with the results from the nonparametric model. Additionally, the following variables have a positive impact on technology adoption in the nonparametric model: landholding size and number of animals.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/162692
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Paper provided by Southern Agricultural Economics Association in its series 2014 Annual Meeting, February 1-4, 2014, Dallas, Texas with number 162692.

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Date of creation: Jan 2014
Handle: RePEc:ags:saea14:162692
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.saea.org/

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  1. France Maphosa, 2007. "Remittances and development: the impact of migration to South Africa on rural livelihoods in southern Zimbabwe," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(1), pages 123-136.
  2. Kevin E. Staub & Rainer Winkelmann, 2013. "Consistent Estimation Of ZeroÔÇÉInflated Count Models," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(6), pages 673-686, 06.
  3. Abhijit Sharma & Alastair Bailey & Iain Fraser, 2011. "Technology Adoption and Pest Control Strategies Among UK Cereal Farmers: Evidence from Parametric and Nonparametric Count Data Models," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(1), pages 73-92, 02.
  4. Shujie Ma & Jeffrey S. Racine & Lijian Yang, 2015. "Spline Regression in the Presence of Categorical Predictors," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(5), pages 705-717, 08.
  5. Dean Yang, 2011. "Migrant Remittances," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 129-152, Summer.
  6. Shujie Ma & Jeffrey S. Racine, 2012. "Additive Regression Splines With Irrelevant Categorical and Continuous Regressors," Department of Economics Working Papers 2012-07, McMaster University.
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