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A mixture growth model for migrants' remittances: An application to the German Socio-Economic Panel

Author

Listed:
  • Silvia Bacci

    () (Universita' di Perugia (IT))

  • Francesco Bartolucci

    () (Universita' di Perugia (IT))

  • Giulia Bettin

    () (Universita' Politecnica delle Marche and MoFiR (IT))

  • Claudia Pigini

    () (Universita' Politecnica delle Marche, MoFiR)

Abstract

We propose a bivariate mixture growth model with concomitant variables to study the time profiles of international remittances sent by first-generation migrants in Germany from 1996 to 2012. The latent class approach allows us to identify homogeneous sub-groups of migrants associated with different trajectories for their remitting behavior, which can be interpreted in the light of the theoretical economic background. In addition, the latent class model combined with the concomitant variable approach allows us to uncover whether the assignment of migrants to a specific sub-group can be ascribed to their observable characteristics, namely their return intention, as conjectured by the theoretical models.

Suggested Citation

  • Silvia Bacci & Francesco Bartolucci & Giulia Bettin & Claudia Pigini, 2017. "A mixture growth model for migrants' remittances: An application to the German Socio-Economic Panel," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 145, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:anc:wmofir:145
    as

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    File URL: http://docs.dises.univpm.it/web/quaderni/pdfmofir/Mofir145.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2017
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. François-Charles Wolff & Ralitza Dimova, 2006. "How Do Migrants Care for Their Elderly Parents? Time, Money and Location," Swiss Journal of Economics and Statistics (SJES), Swiss Society of Economics and Statistics (SSES), vol. 142(V), pages 123-130.
    2. Albert Bollard & David McKenzie & Melanie Morten & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Remittances and the Brain Drain Revisited: The Microdata Show That More Educated Migrants Remit More," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 132-156, May.
    3. Thomas Bauer & Mathias Sinning, 2011. "The savings behavior of temporary and permanent migrants in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 421-449, April.
    4. S. Bacci & S. Pandolfi & F. Pennoni, 2014. "A comparison of some criteria for states selection in the latent Markov model for longitudinal data," Advances in Data Analysis and Classification, Springer;German Classification Society - Gesellschaft für Klassifikation (GfKl);Japanese Classification Society (JCS);Classification and Data Analysis Group of the Italian Statistical Society (CLADAG);International Federation of Classification Societies (IFCS), vol. 8(2), pages 125-145, June.
    5. Bartolucci Francesco & Murphy Thomas Brendan, 2015. "A finite mixture latent trajectory model for modeling ultrarunners’ behavior in a 24-hour race," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 11(4), pages 193-203, December.
    6. de la Briere, Benedicte & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & de Janvry, Alain & Lambert, Sylvie, 2002. "The roles of destination, gender, and household composition in explaining remittances: an analysis for the Dominican Sierra," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 309-328, August.
    7. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    8. Dean Yang, 2011. "Migrant Remittances," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 129-152, Summer.
    9. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
    10. Mathias Czaika & John Spray, 2013. "Drivers and Dynamics of Internal and International Remittances," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(10), pages 1299-1315, October.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bivariate model; Concomitant variables approach; Latent class model; Latent trajectory model; Longitudinal data; Remittances;

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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