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Remittances and Return Migration

Author

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  • Collier, William

    () (University of Kent)

  • Piracha, Matloob

    () (University of Kent)

  • Randazzo, Teresa

    () (University of Kent)

Abstract

This paper utilises survey data of return migrants to analyse the determinants of remittances sent while the migrants were abroad. We approach our research question from the perspective of three sending countries in the Maghreb, namely Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia. We investigate the remittance behaviour using the migrants’ conditions before migration as well as during the migration experience. Using a two-part model, we show that the decision to remit and the amount remitted depend on a combination of different migrant characteristics as well as the duration and form of migration. We also consider if the remittance behaviour is dependent on the type of return: decided or compelled. We show that those who decided to return have a higher probability to remit for investment purposes and remit more as the time spent abroad increases.

Suggested Citation

  • Collier, William & Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa, 2011. "Remittances and Return Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 6091, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6091
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    Cited by:

    1. Ardiana Gashi & Nick Adnett, 2015. "The Determinants of Return Migration: Evidence for Kosovo," Croatian Economic Survey, The Institute of Economics, Zagreb, vol. 17(2), pages 57-81, December.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Joseph-Simon Görlach, 2016. "The Economics of Temporary Migrations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 98-136, March.
    3. Mduduzi Biyase & Fiona Tregenna, 2016. "Determinants of remittances in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 176, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. Mannan, Kazi Abdul & Farhana, Khandaker Mursheda, 2014. "Rural Household Contribution to the Financial and Capital Market in Bangladesh: A Micro Level Study of Remittances from Italy," MPRA Paper 60309, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Fatma MABROUK, 2013. "À la recherche d’une typologie des migrants de retour : le cas des pays du Maghreb," Cahiers du GREThA 2013-06, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    6. Ahmed, Junaid & Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2015. "Do transfer costs matter for foreign remittances? A gravity model approach," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-12, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    7. Ahmed, Junaid & Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2014. "What drives bilateral remittances to Pakistan? A gravity model approach," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 209, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    8. François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Do the Return Intentions of French Migrants Affect Their Transfer Behaviour?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(10), pages 1358-1373, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    remittances; return migration; Maghreb countries;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F24 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Remittances

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