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An Investigation Of Household Remittance Behaviour: Evidence From The United Kingdom




Overseas remittances are a vital source of income for many developing economies. In this paper we empirically model the remittance behaviour of a diverse set of ethnic minority households in England and Wales using survey data. Our results indicate that the probability of remitting is higher for richer households and for those containing more immigrants. Measures of social distance also appear to influence the sending of remittances. Significant ethnic differences in the incidence of remitting and the timing of payments remain after controlling for these and other factors. Copyright © 2007 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and The University of Manchester.

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  • Ken Clark & Stephen Drinkwater, 2007. "An Investigation Of Household Remittance Behaviour: Evidence From The United Kingdom," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(6), pages 717-741, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:75:y:2007:i:6:p:717-741

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marcel Kerkhofs & Maarten Lindeboom, 2000. "Health and Work of the Elderly: Subjective Health Measures, Reporting Errors and the Endogenous Relationship Between Health and Work," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0653, Econometric Society.
    2. Melanie K. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2006. "Disability, gender, and the British labour market," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 407-449, July.
    3. Julie L. Hotchkiss, 2004. "Growing part-time employment among workers with disabilities: marginalization or opportunity?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Q 3, pages 25-40.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bettin, Giulia & Lucchetti, Riccardo & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2012. "Endogeneity and sample selection in a model for remittances," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 370-384.
    2. Hulya Ulku, 2012. "Remitting Behaviour of Turkish Migrants: Evidence from Household Data in Germany," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(14), pages 3139-3158, November.
    3. Collier, William & Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa, 2011. "Remittances and Return Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 6091, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Giulia BETTIN & Riccardo LUCCHETTI, 2012. "Intertemporal remittance behaviour by immigrants in Germany," Working Papers 385, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Rupayan Gupta & S. Aaron Hegde, 2009. "An Exploratory Study of Financial Remittances Among Non-Resident Indians in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 184-192, June.
    6. Giulia Bettin & Riccardo Lucchetti, 2012. "Interval regression models with endogenous explanatory variables," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 475-498, October.
    7. Bettin, Giulia & Lucchetti, Riccardo & Zazzaro, Alberto, 2009. "Income, consumption and remittances: Evidence from immigrants to Australia," HWWI Research Papers 3-21, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    8. Tineke Fokkema & Eralba Cela & Elena Ambrosetti, 2013. "Giving from the Heart or from the Ego? Motives behind Remittances of the Second Generation in Europe," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(3), pages 539-572, September.
    9. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2011. "Remittances as a social status signaling device," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(4), pages 305-318, December.

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