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Intertemporal Remittance Behaviour by Immigrants in Germany

  • Giulia Bettin
  • Riccardo Lucchetti

In this paper, we use data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in the 1997-2009 period for a large sample of migrants from 84 countries in order to develop an empirical model for the propensity by migrants to remit. Our model takes into full account the intertemporal aspects of the problem, which has been ignored by a large part of the applied literature, despite its theoretical and empirical importance. We find that most results already established in the empirical literature are confirmed; however, the intertemporal nature of the remittance behaviour emerges very clearly, giving rise to individual patterns which are difficult to synthesize by a simple description. Building on our framework, we find also support for theoretical models which predict different remittance time paths between return and permanent migrants.

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File URL: http://www.diw.de/documents/publikationen/73/diw_01.c.411751.de/diw_sp0505.pdf
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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) in its series SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research with number 505.

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Length: 23 p.
Date of creation: 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp505
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Web page: http://www.diw.de/en/soep
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  1. Whitney Newey, 1999. "Two Step Series Estimation of Sample Selection Models," Working papers 99-04, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  2. Bollard, Albert & McKenzie, David & Morten, Melanie & Rapoport, Hillel, 2009. "Remittances and the Brain Drain Revisited: The Microdata Show That More Educated Migrants Remit More," IZA Discussion Papers 4534, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Brown, Richard P. C., 1997. "Estimating remittance functions for Pacific Island Migrants," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 613-626, January.
  4. Elke Holst & Andrea Schäfer & Mechthild Schrooten, 2008. "Gender, Migration, Remittances: Evidence from Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 111, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  5. Amelie Constant & Douglas S. Massey, 2003. "Self-selection, earnings, and out-migration: A longitudinal study of immigrants to Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 16(4), pages 631-653, November.
  6. Jeffrey M Wooldridge, 2002. "Simple solutions to the initial conditions problem in dynamic, nonlinear panel data models with unobserved heterogeneity," CeMMAP working papers CWP18/02, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  7. Christelle Viauroux, G.L. Gayle, 2004. "Root-N Consistent Semiparametric Eestimators of a Dynamic Panel Sample Selection Model," University of Cincinnati, Economics Working Papers Series 2004-05, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics.
  8. Thomas Bauer & Mathias Sinning, 2011. "The savings behavior of temporary and permanent migrants in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 421-449, April.
  9. Mathias Sinning, 2011. "Determinants of savings and remittances: empirical evidence from immigrants to Germany," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 45-67, March.
  10. Funkhouser, Edward, 1995. "Remittances from International Migration: A Comparison of El Salvador and Nicaragua," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(1), pages 137-46, February.
  11. Semykina, Anastasia & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2010. "Estimating panel data models in the presence of endogeneity and selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 157(2), pages 375-380, August.
  12. Dustmann, Christian & Mestres, Josep, 2010. "Remittances and temporary migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 62-70, May.
  13. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz - Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets: An Example Using the German SOEP," Data Documentation 53, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  14. Elke Holst & Andrea Schäfer & Mechthild Schrooten, 2008. "Bringing Home the Money: Xenophobia and Remittances: The Case of Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 774, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  15. Dustmann, Christian & van Soest, Arthur, 1998. "Language and the Earnings of Immigrants," CEPR Discussion Papers 2012, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  16. Anastasia Semykina & Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2013. "Estimation of dynamic panel data models with sample selection," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(1), pages 47-61, 01.
  17. Stewart, Mark, 2006. "The Inter-related Dynamics of Unemployment and Low-Wage Employment," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 741, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  18. Giulia BETTIN & Riccardo LUCCHETTI & Alberto ZAZZARO, 2011. "Endogeneity and sample selection in a model for remittances," Working Papers 361, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
  19. Piracha, Matloob & Zhu, Yu, 2007. "Precautionary Savings by Natives and Immigrants in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 2942, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  20. Kyriazidou, Ekaterini, 2001. "Estimation of Dynamic Panel Data Sample Selection Models," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(3), pages 543-72, July.
  21. Poirine, Bernard, 1997. "A theory of remittances as an implicit family loan arrangement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 589-611, January.
  22. Ken Clark & Stephen Drinkwater, 2007. "An Investigation Of Household Remittance Behaviour: Evidence From The United Kingdom," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 75(6), pages 717-741, December.
  23. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Remittances as insurance: evidence from Mexican immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(2), pages 227-254, June.
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