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Do remittances respond to revolutions? The Evidence from Tunisia

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  • Edelbloude, Johanna
  • Fontan Sers, Charlotte
  • Makhlouf, Farid

Abstract

Remittances are an important financial flow to developing countries. The objective of this paper is to empirically investigate the reaction of Tunisian migrants through their remittances to Arab Spring in Tunisia. From monthly data acquired using times-series techniques for remittances from January 2000 to December 2016, we find reasonably strong evidence that remittances associated with Arab Spring increased. Remittances can play a positive role in absorbing economic shocks resulting from political revolution in home countries. These governments could benefit from migrants to boost their countries’ development.

Suggested Citation

  • Edelbloude, Johanna & Fontan Sers, Charlotte & Makhlouf, Farid, 2017. "Do remittances respond to revolutions? The Evidence from Tunisia," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 94-101.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:riibaf:v:42:y:2017:i:c:p:94-101
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ribaf.2017.04.044
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    Cited by:

    1. Ilham Haouas & Naceur Kheraief & Arusha Cooray & Syed Jawad Hussain Shahzad, 2019. "Time-Varying Casual Nexuses Between Remittances and Financial Development in Some MENA Countries," Working Papers 1294, Economic Research Forum, revised 2019.

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    Keywords

    Remittances; Arab Spring; Tunisia; times series;

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