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Determinants of Workers Remittances : The Case of Turkey

Author

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  • Bilin Neyapti
  • Kivilcim Metin-Ozcan
  • Osman Tuncay Aydas

Abstract

Workers' remittance flows to Turkey have dramatically increased since the 1960s, constituting a significant proportion of imports. The empirical evidence in this paper indicates that black market premium, interest rate differential, inflation rate, growth, home and host country income levels, and periods of military administration in Turkey have significantly affected these flows. Among them, the negatively significant effects of the black market premium, inflation, and a dummy for periods of military administration point at the importance of sound exchange rate policies and economic and political stability in attracting remittance flows. In addition, both investment and consumption-smoothing motives are observed, though the former of which appears more prevalent after the 1980s.
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Suggested Citation

  • Bilin Neyapti & Kivilcim Metin-Ozcan & Osman Tuncay Aydas, 2004. "Determinants of Workers Remittances : The Case of Turkey," Working Papers 0405, Department of Economics, Bilkent University.
  • Handle: RePEc:bil:wpaper:0405
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    Cited by:

    1. Kosse, Anneke & Vermeulen, Robert, 2014. "Migrants’ Choice of Remittance Channel: Do General Payment Habits Play a Role?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 213-227.
    2. Sayan, Serdar & Tekin-Koru, Ayca, 2007. "Remittances, Business Cycles and Poverty: The Recent Turkish Experience," MPRA Paper 6029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. RANA Rezwanul Hasan & HASHMI Rubayyat, 2015. "The Determinants Of Worker Remittance In Terms Of Foreign Factors: The Case Of Bangladesh," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 10(3), pages 81-93, December.
    4. Serdar Sayan, 2006. "Business Cycles and Workers' Remittances; How Do Migrant Workers Respond to Cyclical Movements of GDP At Home?," IMF Working Papers 06/52, International Monetary Fund.
    5. Deodat E. Adenutsi & Meshach J. Aziakpono & Matthew K. Ocran, 2011. "The Changing Impact Of Macroeconomic Environment On Remittance Inflows In Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Academic Research in Economics, Spiru Haret University, Faculty of Accounting and Financial Management Constanta, vol. 3(2 (July)), pages 136-167.
    6. Daniel Pop, 2006. "The Developmental Effectiveness of Remittances: Case Study on Huedin Town, Romania," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 64, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. Deodat E. Adenutsi, 2014. "macroeconomic determinants of workers’ remittances and compensation of employees in sub-saharan Africa," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 48(1), pages 337-360, January-M.
    8. Magnusson, Kristin, 2009. "The Impact of U.S. Regional Business Cycles on Remittances to Latin America," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 710, Stockholm School of Economics.
    9. Kadir KARAGÖZ, 2016. "Migration – trade nexus revisited: Empirical evidence from Turkish emigrants in OECD countries," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(4(609), W), pages 127-142, Winter.
    10. Laetitia Duval & François-Charles Wolff, 2009. "L'effet des transferts migratoires sur la déforestation dans les pays en développement," Working Papers hal-00421222, HAL.
    11. Safaa Tabit & Charaf-Eddine Moussir, 2016. "Macroeconomic Determinants of Migrants’ Remittances: Evidence from a Panel of Developing Countries," International Journal of Business and Social Research, MIR Center for Socio-Economic Research, vol. 6(7), pages 1-11, July.
    12. repec:ris:betajl:0014 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sule Akkoyunlu & Konstantin A. Kholodilin, 2006. "What Affects the Remittances of Turkish Workers: Turkish or German Output?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 622, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    14. Gazi M. Hassan & Mark J. Holmes, 2017. "How Do Workers' Remittances Respond to Lending Rates?," Working Papers in Economics 17/02, University of Waikato.
    15. Barua, Shubhasish & Majumder, Md. Alauddin & Akhtaruzzaman, Dr. Md., 2007. "Determinants of Workers’ Remittances in Bangladesh: An Empirical Study," MPRA Paper 15080, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Naiditch, Claire & Vranceanu, Radu, 2010. "Equilibrium migration with invested remittances: The EECA evidence," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 454-474, December.
    17. Naheem Mahtab, 2015. "The Effect of Macroeconomic Variables on the Inflow of Remittance in Bangladesh," Economy, Asian Online Journal Publishing Group, vol. 2(1), pages 21-31.
    18. Hrushikesh Mallick & Mantu Kumar Mahalik, 2016. "Motivating Factors Of Remittances Inflows Into Developing Asian Economies," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(04), pages 1-26, September.
    19. Kakhkharov, Jakhongir & Akimov, Alexandr & Rohde, Nicholas, 2017. "Transaction costs and recorded remittances in the post-Soviet economies: Evidence from a new dataset on bilateral flows," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 98-107.
    20. Kadir KARAGÖZ, 2016. "Migration – trade nexus revisited: Empirical evidence from Turkish emigrants in OECD countries," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(4(609), W), pages 127-142, Winter.

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