IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/jdevst/v51y2015i10p1358-1373.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Do the Return Intentions of French Migrants Affect Their Transfer Behaviour?

Author

Listed:
  • François-Charles Wolff

Abstract

This paper investigates to what extent the return behaviour of migrants affects their transfer decisions, both at the extensive and intensive margins. We use a unique data set collected on migrants aged 45-70 living in France, with detailed information on both return intentions at retirement and on private transfers. We find that the temporary nature of migration strongly influences the pattern of transfers made by migrants. The probability of remitting for either personal savings or to family members in the origin country increases by more than 10 percentage points with return plans, the latter having no effect on gifts to family members living in France. At the intensive margin, the amount of personal savings sent to the origin country is about twice as high for migrants who intend to return.

Suggested Citation

  • François-Charles Wolff, 2015. "Do the Return Intentions of French Migrants Affect Their Transfer Behaviour?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(10), pages 1358-1373, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:51:y:2015:i:10:p:1358-1373
    DOI: 10.1080/00220388.2015.1046443
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220388.2015.1046443
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Albert Bollard & David McKenzie & Melanie Morten & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Remittances and the Brain Drain Revisited: The Microdata Show That More Educated Migrants Remit More," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 25(1), pages 132-156, May.
    2. Adams, Richard Jr. & Page, John, 2005. "Do international migration and remittances reduce poverty in developing countries?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1645-1669, October.
    3. Hainmueller, Jens, 2012. "Entropy Balancing for Causal Effects: A Multivariate Reweighting Method to Produce Balanced Samples in Observational Studies," Political Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(01), pages 25-46, December.
    4. Thomas Bauer & Mathias Sinning, 2011. "The savings behavior of temporary and permanent migrants in Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(2), pages 421-449, April.
    5. Dean Yang, 2008. "International Migration, Remittances and Household Investment: Evidence from Philippine Migrants' Exchange Rate Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 591-630, April.
    6. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    7. Gourieroux, Christian & Monfort, Alain & Renault, Eric & Trognon, Alain, 1987. "Simulated residuals," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1-2), pages 201-252.
    8. Matloob Piracha & Teresa Randazzo, 2011. "Remittances and Return Migration," Studies in Economics 1118, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    9. I R Gordon & I Molho, 1995. "Duration dependence in migration behaviour: cumulative inertia versus stochastic change," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 27(12), pages 1961-1975, December.
    10. Augustin de Coulon & Francois-Charles Wolff, 2010. "Location intentions of immigrants at retirement: stay/return or go 'back and forth'?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(26), pages 3319-3333.
    11. Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport, 2012. "Globalization, Brain Drain, and Development," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 50(3), pages 681-730, September.
    12. Dustmann, Christian & Mestres, Josep, 2010. "Remittances and temporary migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 62-70, May.
    13. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "New evidence on the role of remittances on healthcare expenditures by Mexican households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 69-98, March.
    14. David McKenzie & Hillel Rapoport, 2011. "Can migration reduce educational attainment? Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 24(4), pages 1331-1358, October.
    15. Hendrik P. van Dalen & Kène Henkens, 2013. "Explaining emigration intentions and behaviour in the Netherlands, 2005-10," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(2), pages 225-241, July.
    16. Christian Dustmann & Josep Mestres, 2010. "Savings, Asset Holdings, and Temporary Migration," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1005, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    17. I R Gordon & I Molho, 1995. "Duration Dependence in Migration Behaviour: Cumulative Inertia versus Stochastic Change," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 27(12), pages 1961-1975, December.
    18. Woodruff, Christopher & Zenteno, Rene, 2007. "Migration networks and microenterprises in Mexico," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 509-528, March.
    19. Christian Dustmann & Yoram Weiss, 2007. "Return Migration: Theory and Empirical Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0702, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    20. Christian Dustmann & Yoram Weiss, 2007. "Return Migration: Theory and Empirical Evidence from the UK," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 236-256, June.
    21. David Roodman, 2011. "Fitting fully observed recursive mixed-process models with cmp," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 11(2), pages 159-206, June.
    22. Richard Adams, 2011. "Evaluating the Economic Impact of International Remittances On Developing Countries Using Household Surveys: A Literature Review," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(6), pages 809-828.
    23. Alejandra Cox Edwards & Manuelita Ureta, 2003. "International Migration, Remittances, and Schooling: Evidence from El Salvador," NBER Working Papers 9766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Edwards, Alejandra Cox & Ureta, Manuelita, 2003. "International migration, remittances, and schooling: evidence from El Salvador," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 429-461, December.
    25. Christian Dustmann, 2003. "Children and return migration," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 16(4), pages 815-830, November.
    26. François-Charles Wolff & Seymour Spilerman & Claudine Attias-Donfut, 2007. "Transfers From Migrants To Their Children: Evidence That Altruism And Cultural Factors Matter," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 53(4), pages 619-644, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chabé-Ferret, Bastien & Machado, Joël & Wahba, Jackline, 2018. "Remigration intentions and migrants' behavior," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 56-72.
    2. Ngoc Thi Minh Tran & Michael P. Cameron & Jacques Poot, 2018. "Return or Not Return? The Role of Home-Country Institutional Quality in Vietnamese Migrants’ Return Intentions," Working Papers in Economics 18/04, University of Waikato.
    3. Bastien Chabé-Ferret & Joël Machado & Jackline Wahba, 2016. "Return Plans and Migrants' Behavior," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016016, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:51:y:2015:i:10:p:1358-1373. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/FJDS20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.