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The Impact of Maize Hybrids on Income, Poverty, and Inequality among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya

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  • Mathenge, Mary K.
  • Smale, Melinda
  • Olwande, John

Abstract

The development and diffusion of hybrid maize seed in Kenya is a widely documented success story. Yet, to our knowledge, a missing link in existing research on maize hybrids in Kenya has been a rigorous analysis of the impacts of seed adoption on farmer welfare. The objective of this study is to initiate that research, using econometric methods applied to a balanced panel of 1,243 maize-growing households surveyed in 2000, 2004, 2007, and 2010. Data were collected by Tegemeo Institute of Egerton University in collaboration with Michigan State University.

Suggested Citation

  • Mathenge, Mary K. & Smale, Melinda & Olwande, John, 2012. "The Impact of Maize Hybrids on Income, Poverty, and Inequality among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 146931, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:146931
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/146931
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; International Development;

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