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Adoption of Maize Production Technologies in the Coastal Lowlands of Kenya

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  • Wekesa, E.
  • Mwangi, Wilfred
  • Verkuijl, Hugo
  • Danda, Milton Kengo
  • De Groote, Hugo

Abstract

Maize is the major food crop grown in the coastal region of Kenya and constitutes a major component of the diet of the population in the region. However, average yields are far below the potential for the region and low production levels create serious food deficits. Over the years, new technologies have been introduced but adoption has remained low, especially for fertilizer. This paper examined current maize-farming practices and technological and socioeconomic factors that influenced adoption in the Kilifi and Kwale Districts of the Coast Province, that together account for half of maize production in the region. The study found low adoption levels for improved maize varieties and technology, especially fertilizer, among farmers in the area. Farmers cited poor availability of improved varieties, high cost, lack of knowledge, and unfavourable characteristics of improved varieties as reasons for non-adoption. The high price and poor availability of fertilizers, farmers’ inexperience with them, and their perception that soils were already fertile were among reasons given for low fertilizer use. The low levels of adoption of improved varieties indicate that they are not meeting farmers’ needs. The authors recommend that researchers communicate with and include farmers’ criteria when breeding varieties. In addition, alternative options should be extended to farmers who are not able to use inorganic fertilizers. Finally, given the major influence of the institutional environment found in the study, it is recommended that extension services be strengthened, especially where lack of knowledge was cited as a hindrance to adoption.

Suggested Citation

  • Wekesa, E. & Mwangi, Wilfred & Verkuijl, Hugo & Danda, Milton Kengo & De Groote, Hugo, 2003. "Adoption of Maize Production Technologies in the Coastal Lowlands of Kenya," Miscellaneous Reports 56109, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:cimmmr:56109
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.56109
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/56109/files/coastalKenya.pdf
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ariga, Joshua & Jayne, Thom S. & Nyoro, James K., 2006. "Factors Driving the Growth in Fertilizer Consumption in Kenya, 1990-2005: Sustaining the Momentum in Kenya and Lessons for Broader Replicability in Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 202619, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
    2. Mathenge, Mary K. & Smale, Melinda & Olwande, John, 2012. "The Impact of Maize Hybrids on Income, Poverty, and Inequality among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 146931, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Maurice Ogada & Germano Mwabu & Diana Muchai, 2014. "Farm technology adoption in Kenya: a simultaneous estimation of inorganic fertilizer and improved maize variety adoption decisions," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-18, December.
    4. Smale, Melinda, 2011. "Does Household Headship Affect Demand for Hybrid Maize Seed in Kenya? An Exploratory Analysis Based on 2010 Survey Data," Food Security International Development Working Papers 118475, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Tavneet Suri, 2009. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," NBER Working Papers 15346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. B Kelsey Jack, "undated". "Market Inefficiencies and the Adoption of Agricultural Technologies in Developing Countries," CID Working Papers 50, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    7. Mizab, Kolsoum Azizi & Falsafian, Azadeh, 2017. "Factors Affecting Land Allocation to Saffron and its Expansion in Marand County, Iran," International Journal of Agricultural Management and Development (IJAMAD), Iranian Association of Agricultural Economics, vol. 7(2), June.
    8. Suri, Tavneet, 2006. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Center Discussion Papers 28445, Yale University, Economic Growth Center.

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    Keywords

    Crop Production/Industries;

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