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Has Kenyan Farmers' Access to Markets and Services Improved? Panel Survey Evidence, 1997-2007

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Listed:
  • Chamberlin, Jordan
  • Jayne, Thom S.

Abstract

This report uses panel data on 1,267 smallholder households to monitor changes in their access to markets and services. We find that Kenyan smallholders’ proximity to infrastructure, markets, and services has improved markedly over the last decade. These improvements, however, have not been uniformly distributed over either time or space. Farmers in high-potential areas of the country continue to enjoy closer proximity to most kinds of markets and services compared to low-potential areas, but the greatest relative improvements over the 1997-2007 period have been in areas of medium and low potential. We also distinguish between public and private investments in examining changes in smallholders’ access to markets. Changes deriving from public investments have tended to be most geographically equitable; private investments appear to have been relatively concentrated in the less productive farming areas of the country, possibly because earlier investments focused on high-potential areas, leaving unexploited investment opportunities in the less productive areas. These changes in smallholders’ access to markets may offer important insights about the private sector’s response to market liberalization in recent Kenyan history.
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Suggested Citation

  • Chamberlin, Jordan & Jayne, Thom S., 2009. "Has Kenyan Farmers' Access to Markets and Services Improved? Panel Survey Evidence, 1997-2007," Working Papers 202605, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:egtewp:202605
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/202605/files/Wp37-Kenyan-Farmers-Access-to-Markets-and-Services.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Marcel Fafchamps & Forhad Shilpi, 2003. "The spatial division of labour in Nepal," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 23-66.
    2. David Stifel & Bart Minten, 2008. "Isolation and agricultural productivity," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(1), pages 1-15, July.
    3. David E. Bloom & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "Geography, Demography, and Economic Growth in Africa," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(2), pages 207-296.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chamberlin, Jordan, 2013. "Infrastructure, services, and smallholder income growth: evidence from Kenyan panel data," 2013 AAAE Fourth International Conference, September 22-25, 2013, Hammamet, Tunisia 161269, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).
    2. Mathenge, Mary K. & Smale, Melinda & Olwande, John, 2012. "The Impact of Maize Hybrids on Income, Poverty, and Inequality among Smallholder Farmers in Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 146931, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Smale, Melinda & Olwande, John, 2011. "Is Older Better? Maize Hybrid Change on Household Farms in Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 118474, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Olwande, John & Smale, Melinda & Mathenge, Mary K. & Place, Frank & Mithöfer, Dagmar, 2015. "Agricultural marketing by smallholders in Kenya: A comparison of maize, kale and dairy," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 22-32.
    5. Smale, Melinda, 2011. "Does Household Headship Affect Demand for Hybrid Maize Seed in Kenya? An Exploratory Analysis Based on 2010 Survey Data," Food Security International Development Working Papers 118475, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.

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