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Is Older Better? Maize Hybrid Change on Household Farms in Kenya

  • Smale, Melinda
  • Olwande, John

Kenya has been recognized globally as maize success story since the 1970s. Released on the eve of independence, Kenya’s first maize hybrid diffused faster than did hybrids in the U.S Corn Belt during the 1930s-1940s. In recent decades, policy researchers have lamented that earlier gains in maize productivity have not lived up to their potential. Claims of stagnating yields and stagnating adoption are offset here, at least in part, by longitudinal survey data showing rising yields and adoption rates on farms. Tegemeo survey data confirm that Kenya has reached its adoption ceiling years ago in the major maize producing zones of the country, and is near to doing so in other zones. Data show adoption rates topping 80% of farmers.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/118474
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Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Food Security International Development Working Papers with number 118474.

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Date of creation: Nov 2011
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Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:118474
Contact details of provider: Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
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Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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  1. Smale, Melinda & Byerlee, Derek R. & Jayne, Thomas S., 2011. "Maize Revolutions in Sub-Saharan Africa," Miscellaneous Publications 113651, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  2. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter B. R. (ed.), 2010. "Successes in African agriculture: Lessons for the future," IFPRI books, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), number 978-0-8018-9503-6, May.
  3. Van Dusen, M. Eric, 2000. "In Situ Conservation Of Crop Genetic Resources In The Mexican Milpa System," Dissertations 11941, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  4. Tavneet Suri, 2011. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 79(1), pages 159-209, 01.
  5. Melinda Smale & Joginder Singh & Salvatore Di Falco & Patricia Zambrano, 2008. "Wheat breeding, productivity and slow variety change: evidence from the Punjab of India after the Green Revolution ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 52(4), pages 419-432, December.
  6. Chamberlin, Jordan & Jayne, Thom S., 2009. "Has Kenyan Farmers' Access to Markets and Services Improved? Panel Survey Evidence, 1997-2007," Working Papers 202605, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  7. Kirimi, Lilian & Sitko, Nicholas & Jayne, Thom S. & Karin, Francis & Muyanga, Milu & Sheahan, Megan & Flock, James & Bor, Gilbert, 2011. "A Farm Gate-to-Consumer Value Chain Analysis of Kenya's Maize Marketing System," Working Papers 202597, Egerton University, Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development.
  8. Jacob Ricker-Gilbert & Thomas S. Jayne & Ephraim Chirwa, 2010. "Subsidies and Crowding Out: A Double-Hurdle Model of Fertilizer Demand in Malawi," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 26-42.
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