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An Economic and Institutional Analysis of Maize Research in Kenya

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  • Karanja, Daniel David

Abstract

Maize, the most important food crop in Kenya, contributes 44 percent of the per-capita, calorie intake. Increases in maize production over the past three decades have been attributed to the availability and adoption of modern maize techniques, especially fertilizer and hybrid seed. This paper estimates the rate of return to maize research to be 53 to 61 percent, and reveals that his impact was aided by complementary agricultural extension and seed multiplication and distribution programs. The paper describes the institutional framework that may have led to one of Kenya’s agricultural research success stories. It also poses challenges to the future of maize production in Kenya.

Suggested Citation

  • Karanja, Daniel David, 1996. "An Economic and Institutional Analysis of Maize Research in Kenya," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54693, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:54693
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54693
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laker-Ojok, Rita, 1994. "The Rate of Return to Agricultural Research in Uganda: The Case of Oilseeds and Maize," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54728, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Stilwell, Thomas C., 1985. "Periodicals for Microcomputers: An Annotated Bibliography, Second Edition," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54750, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Haggblade, Steven & Liedholm, Carl & Mead, Donald C., 1986. "The Effect of Policy and Policy Reforms on Non-Agricultural Enterprises and Employment in Developing Countries: A Review of Past Experiences," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54744, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Stilwell, Thomas C., 1983. "Software Directories for Microcomputers: An Annotated Bibliography," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54762, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Weber, Michael T. & Pease, James W. & Vincent, Warren H. & Crawford, Eric W. & Stilwell, Thomas C., 1983. "Microcomputers and Programmable Calculators for Agricultural Research in Developing Countries," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54765, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    6. Boughton, Duncan & Frahan, Bruno Henry de, 1994. "Agricultural Research Impact Assessment: The Case of Maize Technology Adoption in Southern Mali," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54729, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    7. D'Agostino, Victoire C. & Staatz, John M., 1989. "Food Security and Economic Growth in the Sahel: A Summary of the September 1989 Cereals Workshop," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54737, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    8. Eicher, Carl K. & Baker, Doyle Curtis, 1982. "Etude Critique de la Recherche sur la Developpement Agricole en Afrique Subsaharienne," Food Security International Development Papers 54070, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    9. Jayne, Thomas S., 1993. "Sources and Effects of Instability in the World Rice Market," Food Security International Development Papers 54059, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    10. Stilwell, Thomas C., 1983. "Periodicals for Microcomputers: An Annotated Bibliography," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54764, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ogada, Maurice & Nyangena, Wilfred, 2015. "Impact of Improved Farm Technologies on Yields: The Case of Improved Maize Varieties and Inorganic Fertilizers in Kenya," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212590, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    2. Tavneet Suri, 2009. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," NBER Working Papers 15346, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Karanja, Daniel David & Renkow, M. & Crawford, E.W., 2003. "Welfare effects of maize technologies in marginal and high potential regions of Kenya," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 29(3), December.
    4. Tavneet Suri, 2006. "Selection and Comparative Advantage in Technology Adoption," Working Papers 944, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; food policy; maize; Crop Production/Industries; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Downloads July 2008 - July 2009: 19; O18;

    JEL classification:

    • O18 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Urban, Rural, Regional, and Transportation Analysis; Housing; Infrastructure

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