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The Effect of Liberalization on Grain Prices and Marketing Margins in Ethiopia

Author

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  • Jayne, Thomas S.
  • Negassa, Asfaw
  • Myers, Robert J.

Abstract

This report analyzes the effects of grain market reform in Ethiopia on grain prices and price spreads between major wholesale markets. The experience of Ethiopia during the 1990s represents a case in which a relatively consistent and internally-driven program of grain market liberalization has been pursued with the general approval of international lenders and donors. The state marketing board, while not abolished, has been substantially downsized and has become a marginal actor in the current grain marketing system. Hence, the case of Ethiopia between 1990 and 1997 may constitute a particularly important test of the hypothesis expressed by reform advocates that the removal of regulatory constraints on private trade and the transition to a market-oriented system would reduce grain marketing costs and pass along benefits to both farmers and consumers.

Suggested Citation

  • Jayne, Thomas S. & Negassa, Asfaw & Myers, Robert J., 1998. "The Effect of Liberalization on Grain Prices and Marketing Margins in Ethiopia," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54681, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midiwp:54681
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/54681
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hrapsky, Alan & Weber, Michael T. & Riley, Harold, 1985. "A Diagnostic Perspective Assessment of the Production and Marketing System for Mangoes in the Eastern Caribbean," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54748, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    2. Stilwell, Thomas C., 1985. "Periodicals for Microcomputers: An Annotated Bibliography, Second Edition," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54750, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Stilwell, Thomas C., 1983. "Software Directories for Microcomputers: An Annotated Bibliography," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54762, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Liedholm, Carl & Parker, Joan Chamberlin, 1989. "Small Scale Manufacturing Growth in Africa: Initial Evidence," Food Security International Development Working Papers 54738, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kodama, Yuka, 2012. "Young women's economic daily lives in rural Ethiopia," IDE Discussion Papers 344, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    2. Tanguy Bernard & Alemayehu Seyoum Taffesse & Eleni Gabre-Madhin, 2008. "Impact of cooperatives on smallholders' commercialization behavior: evidence from Ethiopia," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(2), pages 147-161, September.
    3. Akiyama, Takamasa & Baffes, John & Larson, Donald F. & Varangis, Panos, 2003. "Commodity market reform in Africa: some recent experience," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 83-115, March.
    4. Quattri, Maria A. & Ozanne, Adam & Wang, Xioabing & Hall, Alastair R., 2011. "On The Role Of The Brokerage Institution In The Development Of Ethiopian Agricultural Markets," 85th Annual Conference, April 18-20, 2011, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 108941, Agricultural Economics Society.
    5. Narayanan, Sudha & Gulati, Ashok, 2002. "Globalization and the smallholders," MTID discussion papers 50, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Takamasa Akiyama & John Baffes & Donald Larson & Panos Varangis, 2001. "Commodity Market Reforms : Lessons of Two Decades," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 13852.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    food security; food policy; grain market reform; Ethiopia; International Relations/Trade; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Downloads June 2008 - July 2009: 37; Q18;

    JEL classification:

    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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