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Economics In The Design, Assessment, Adoption, And Policy Analysis Of I.P.M

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  • Swinton, Scott M.
  • Day, Esther

Abstract

During the past twenty years, economics has played a key role in technology assessment and policy analysis related to integrated pest management (IPM) practices. The paper reviews economic analysis of IPM as applied to evaluating expected profitability, ex ante and ex post adoption, social welfare impacts, returns to research, and policies that affect pest management generally. In specific cases, economic methods have contributed significantly to the development of threshold-based IPM decision support software. Two areas that need greater economic input are assessment of biological pest management practices and the measurement of returns to research in IPM.

Suggested Citation

  • Swinton, Scott M. & Day, Esther, 2000. "Economics In The Design, Assessment, Adoption, And Policy Analysis Of I.P.M," Staff Papers 11789, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11789
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11789
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    1. Mullen, Jeffrey D. & Norton, George W. & Reaves, Dixie Watts, 1997. "Economic Analysis Of Environmental Benefits Of Integrated Pest Management," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(02), December.
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    3. Swinton, Scott M. & Batie, Sandra S. & Schulz, Mary A., 1999. "Fqpa Implementation To Reduce Pesticide Residue Risks: Part Ii: Implementation Alternatives And Strategies," Staff Papers 11488, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Wiles, L. J. & King, R. P. & Schweizer, E. E. & Lybecker, D. W. & Swinton, S. M., 1996. "GWM: General weed management model," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 50(4), pages 355-376.
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    7. Bennett, Anne L. & Pannell, David J., 1998. "Economic evaluation of a weed-activated sprayer for herbicide application to patchy weed populations," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 42(4), December.
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    11. Cubie, Jim, 1999. "Promoting Conservation Innovation In Agriculture Through Crop Insurance," Agricultural Outlook Forum 1999 32928, United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Outlook Forum.
    12. Jayson K. Harper & M. Edward Rister & James W. Mjelde & Bastiaan M. Drees & Michael O. Way, 1990. "Factors Influencing the Adoption of Insect Management Technology," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 72(4), pages 997-1005.
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    14. Robert P. King & Donald W. Lybecker & Anita Regmi & Scott M. Swinton, 1993. "Bioeconomic Models of Crop Production Systems: Design, Development, and Use," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 15(2), pages 389-401.
    15. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Hamilton, Lynn L., 2001. "Ipm In The Salad Bowl: Is It Cost-Effective?," 2001 Annual meeting, August 5-8, Chicago, IL 20621, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

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    Crop Production/Industries;

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