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Biotechnology and the African Farmer

  • Eicher, Carl K.
  • Maredia, Karim
  • Sithole-Niang, Idah
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/11495
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    Paper provided by Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics in its series Staff Papers with number 11495.

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    Date of creation: 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:ags:midasp:11495
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Justin S. Morrill Hall of Agriculture, 446 West Circle Dr., Rm 202, East Lansing, MI 48824-1039
    Phone: (517) 355-4563
    Fax: (517) 432-1800
    Web page: http://www.aec.msu.edu/agecon/
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    1. Gouse, Marnus & Kirsten, Johann F. & Jenkins, Lindie, 2002. "Bt Cotton In South Africa: Adoption And The Impact On Farm Incomes Amongst Small-Scale And Large Scale Farmers," Working Papers 18022, University of Pretoria, Department of Agricultural Economics, Extension and Rural Development.
    2. Edmeades, Svetlana & Smale, Melinda & Renkow, Mitch & Phaneuf, Dan, 2004. "Variety demand within the framework of an agricultural household model with attributes: the case of bananas in Uganda," EPTD discussion papers 125, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Qaim, Matin, 2001. "A prospective evaluation of biotechnology in semi-subsistence agriculture," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(2-3), pages 165-175, September.
    4. Maredia, Mywish K. & Byerlee, Derek R. & Maredia, Karim, 2000. "Investment Strategies For Biotechnology In Emerging Research Systems," Proceedings:Transitions in Agbiotech: Economics of Strategy and Policy, June 24-25, 1999, Washington, D.C. 26022, Regional Research Project NE-165 Private Strategies, Public Policies, and Food System Performance.
    5. Marra, Michele C. & Pardey, Philip G. & Alston, Julian M., 2002. "The payoffs to agricultural biotechnology: an assessment of the evidence," EPTD discussion papers 87, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Qaim, Matin, 2001. "A prospective evaluation of biotechnology in semi -subsistence agriculture," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 25(2-3), September.
    7. Eicher, Carl K., 1999. "Institutions and the African Farmer," Distinguished Economist Lectures 7660, CIMMYT: International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center.
    8. Qaim, Matin, 2003. "Bt Cotton in India: Field Trial Results and Economic Projections," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(12), pages 2115-2127, December.
    9. Kym Anderson & Lee Ann Jacskon, 2004. "Some Implications of GM Food Technology Policies for Sub-Saharan Africa," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers 2004-09, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
    10. Eicher, Carl K., 1995. "Zimbabwe's maize-based Green Revolution: Preconditions for replication," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 805-818, May.
    11. Tollens, Eric, 2002. "Biotechnology In The South: Absolute Necessity Or Illusion?," Working Papers 31827, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.
    12. Kelly, Valerie & Adesina, Akinwumi A. & Gordon, Ann, 2003. "Expanding access to agricultural inputs in Africa: a review of recent market development experience," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 379-404, August.
    13. Nicholas Minot & Lisa Daniels, 2005. "Impact of global cotton markets on rural poverty in Benin," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(s3), pages 453-466, November.
    14. Beintema, Nienke M. & Stads, Gert-Jan, 2004. "Investing in Sub-Saharan African agricultural research," Issue briefs 24, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Kherallah, Mylène & Delgado, Christopher L. & Gabre-Madhin, Eleni Z. & Minot, Nicholas & Johnson, Michael, 2002. "Reforming agricultural markets in Africa," Food policy statements 38, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Svetlana Edmeades & Melinda Smale, 2006. "A trait-based model of the potential demand for a genetically engineered food crop in a developing economy," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(3), pages 351-361, November.
    17. Maumbe, Blessing M. & Swinton, Scott M., 2003. "Hidden health costs of pesticide use in Zimbabwe's smallholder cotton growers," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1559-1571, November.
    18. Byerlee, Derek & Fischer, Ken, 2002. "Accessing Modern Science: Policy and Institutional Options for Agricultural Biotechnology in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 931-948, June.
    19. Rukuni, Mandivamba & Blackie, Malcolm J. & Eicher, Carl K., 1998. "Crafting smallholder-driven agricultural research systems in Southern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(6), pages 1073-1087, June.
    20. Johnson, D Gale, 2002. "Biotechnology Issues for Developing Economies: Comment from the Editor," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(1), pages 1-4, October.
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