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Do farmers with less education realize higher yield gains from GM maize in developing countries? Evidence from the Philippines

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Listed:
  • Jones, Michael S.
  • Rejesus, Roderick M.
  • Brown, Zachary S.
  • Yorobe, Jose M.

Abstract

For genetically-modified (GM) maize with genes for insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxin expression and glyphosate tolerance, there is ample developing world evidence demonstrating general increases in farmer average yields. However, little work carefully examines farmer profiles to explain mechanisms for heterogeneity in yield effects. In this article, we view Bt and stacked traits as simplifying input components, removing much complexity in farmer pest control needs. With panel data from the Philippines, we test whether these traits serve as substitutes or complements to human capital. We thus examine an oft-discussed but previously unexplored facet of Bt technology impacts. Results indicate GM traits are substitutes with proxies for human capital and pest control knowledge. For every year decrease in formal education and maize farming experience, farmers realize significantly higher yield gains from planting GM maize. This evidence provides additional insights about ‘pro-poor’ claims of many GM proponents, given small-scale, poor farmers tend to have lower levels of education.

Suggested Citation

  • Jones, Michael S. & Rejesus, Roderick M. & Brown, Zachary S. & Yorobe, Jose M., 2017. "Do farmers with less education realize higher yield gains from GM maize in developing countries? Evidence from the Philippines," 2017 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2017, Mobile, Alabama 252822, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:saea17:252822
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.252822
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/252822/files/GM%20maize%20in%20Philippines_%20yield%20gains%20and%20educ%20and%20exp%20-%20SAEA%2017_%20final.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Production Economics; Productivity Analysis; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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