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The Role of Gender in ICT-mediated Agricultural Information Campaigns

Author

Listed:
  • Van Campenhout, B.
  • Spielman, D.
  • Lecoutere, E.

Abstract

In agricultural information dissemination campaigns through agricultural advisory services, seemingly small design attributes, such as the way the information is delivered, who delivers the information, or who is targeted by the message, can result in significant differences in effectiveness and inclusiveness of the intervention. In the context of Information & Communication Technology (ICT) mediated knowledge transfer, this study investigates the importance of the gender composition of the person(s) who provide(s) the information and the gender composition of the person(s) who receive(s) the information. In particular, we set up a field experiment among smallholder maize farmers in Uganda to assess if reducing asymmetric information within the household leads to improved outcomes. In addition, we study the effectiveness of promoting a more cooperative approach to household farming. Finally, we test for gender homophily effects, where female farmers learn more from female trainers. Effectiveness is assessed in terms of knowledge gained, adoption of modern inputs and recommend practices, yield, and poverty reduction. Outcomes are dis-aggregated by gender to study changes in intra-household equity and women empowerment. While endline of the study is planned for February 2018, we preview encouraging effects on knowledge transfer as measured immediately after administering the treatments. Acknowledgement : We acknowledge support from USAID's Global Development Lab and Digital Green.

Suggested Citation

  • Van Campenhout, B. & Spielman, D. & Lecoutere, E., 2018. "The Role of Gender in ICT-mediated Agricultural Information Campaigns," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277438, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:277438
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.277438
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    References listed on IDEAS

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