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Finding Missing Markets (and a Disturbing Epilogue): Evidence from an Export Crop Adoption and Marketing Intervention in Kenya*

* This paper has been replicated

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Listed:
  • Nava Ashraf
  • Xavier Giné
  • Dean Karlan

Abstract

Farmers may grow crops for local consumption despite more profitable export options. DrumNet, a Kenyan NGO that helps small farmers adopt and market export crops, conducted a randomized trial to evaluate its impact. DrumNet services increased production of export crops and lowered marketing costs, leading to a 32% income gain for new adopters. The services collapsed one year later when the exporter stopped buying from DrumNet because farmers could not meet new EU production requirements. Farmers sold to other middlemen and defaulted on their loans from DrumNet. Such experiences may explain why farmers are less likely to adopt export crops. Copyright 2009, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Nava Ashraf & Xavier Giné & Dean Karlan, 2009. "Finding Missing Markets (and a Disturbing Epilogue): Evidence from an Export Crop Adoption and Marketing Intervention in Kenya," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 973-990.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:91:y:2009:i:4:p:973-990
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8276.2009.01319.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Replication

    This item has been replicated by:
  • Benjamin D. K. Wood & Michell Dong, 2019. "Recalling Extra Data: A Replication Study of Finding Missing Markets," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(5), pages 926-945, May.
  • More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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    1. Finding Missing Markets (and a Disturbing Epilogue): Evidence from an Export Crop Adoption and Marketing Intervention in Kenya (AJAE 2009) in ReplicationWiki

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