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Do Incentives matter for Knowledge Diffusion? Experimental Evidence from Uganda

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  • Sseruyange, J.
  • Bulte, E.

Abstract

Many development interventions involve training of beneficiaries, based on the assumption that knowledge and skills will spread “automatically” among a wider target population. However, diffusion of knowledge (or innovations) can be slow and incomplete. We use a randomized field experiment in Uganda to assess the impact of providing incentives for knowledge diffusion, and pay trained individuals a fee if they share knowledge obtained during a financial literacy training. Our main results are that incentives increase knowledge sharing, and that it may be cost-effective to provide such incentives. We also document an absence of assortative matching in the social learning process.

Suggested Citation

  • Sseruyange, J. & Bulte, E., 2018. "Do Incentives matter for Knowledge Diffusion? Experimental Evidence from Uganda," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 275896, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae18:275896
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    International Development; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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